groop

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English grope, grupe, groupe, from Old English grōp (ditch), from Proto-Germanic *grōpō (furrow, ditch, trench), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreb-, *gʰrebʰ- (to dig, furrow, scratch). Cognate with Scots gruip (gutter, drain, ditch, trench), North Frisian groop (pit), Dutch groep (a trench, moat), Swedish grop (a pit, ditch, hole, hollow), Old English grēp, grēpe (land-drain, ditch; furrow; burrow; privy). More at grip, groove.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

groop (plural groops)

  1. (obsolete or UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A trench or small ditch.
  2. (obsolete or UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A trench or drain; particularly, a trench or hollow behind the stalls of cows or horses for receiving their dung and urine.
    • 1816, James Cleland, Annals of Glasgow[1], edition Digitized, published 2007, page 373:
      The groop is one foot six inches wide, six and one-half inches deep at one end … to carry off the urine into a reservoir under the Cowhouse, …
    • 2008, Dennis O'Driscoll, Seamus Heaney, Stepping stones:
      Cleaning the byre involved barrowing out the contents of the groop, sluicing it down and rebedding it with clean straw.
  3. (obsolete or UK dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) A pen for cattle; a byre.

Verb[edit]

groop (third-person singular simple present groops, present participle grooping, simple past and past participle grooped)

  1. (obsolete) To make a channel or groove; to form grooves.

Etymology 2[edit]

Alteration of group. More at group.

Noun[edit]

groop (plural groops)

  1. Alternative form of group.
    • 1828, William Taylor, Historic Survey of German Poetry[2], edition Digitized, Treuttel and Würtz, Treuttel Jun. and Richter, published 2007, page 179:
      Revival of Fine Literature — Swiss groop of Poets ...
    • 1834, Charles Augustus Davis, Letters of J. Downing, Major[3], Harper & Brothers, page 158:
      … and laid his Hickory and hat down afore him, and all our folks began to nock noses in little groops here and there;
    • 1985, Thomas Beth, Dieter Jungnickel, Hanfried Lenz, Design Theory[4], edition Digitized, Mathematics, Bibliographisches Institut, ISBN 9783411016754, published 2010, page 560:
      Delete one point x and consider as new groops the point sets B\{x} where B is any block of D containing x.
    • 2004, Dept. of Combinatorics and Optimization, Ars Combinatoria, Volumes 72-73[5], Mathematics, University of Waterloo, page 90:
      A groop divisible design on v points with groop size g and block size k is called a t-GD[k,g,;v] if every subset of t distinct points that contains no two points from the same groop is contained in exactly one block.

Verb[edit]

groop (third-person singular simple present groops, present participle grooping, simple past and past participle grooped)

  1. Alternative form of group.
    • 1810, Alexander Chalmers, Samuel Johnson editor, The works of the English poets, from Chaucer to Cowper[6], edition Digitized, published 2006, page 485:
      I GROOPED in thy pocket pretty peate.
    • 1829, The Battle of Navarino: Or the Renegade[7], edition Digitized, published 2010, page 40:
      Grooped around the fires on which they were preparing their provisions, …

References[edit]

  • groop” in An American Dictionary of the English Language, by Noah Webster, 1828.
  • groop in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911