lyard

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French liart or Latin liardus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lyard

  1. (of a horse) having dappled white and grey spots
    • late 1300s, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Friar's Tale:
      Þat was wel twiȝt, myn owene lyard boy. / I pray God save þee, and Seinte Loy!

Noun[edit]

lyard

  1. a horse which is dappled and spotted in the aforementioned way
    • c. 1264, unknown author, Richard of Almaigne, quoted in 1856, Thomas Percy (editor), Reliques of Ancient English Poetry, page 172:
      Be the luef, be the loht, sue Edward, / Thou shalt ride sporeless o thy lyard,
    • c. 1370-1390, William Langdon, The Vision of Piers Plowman, 1882, Thomas Wright (editor), The Vision and the Creed of Piers Ploughman, Volume 2, page 352:
      Ac so soone so the Samaritan / Hadde sighte of this leode, / He lighte a-down of lyard,

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Adjective[edit]

lyard

  1. Alternative spelling of lyart
    • 1778, in The Critical Review: Or, Annals of Literature (edited by Tobias George Smollett):
      In har'st at the shearing, nae swankies are jeering,
      Our bansters are wrinkled and lyard and grey:
      At a fair or a preaching, nae wooing nae fleetching, []