meed

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English meede, mede, from Old English mēd, meord, meard, meorþ (meed, reward, pay, price, compensation, bribe), from Proto-Germanic *mēzdō, *mizdō (meed), from Proto-Indo-European *mizdʰ- (to pay). Cognate with obsolete Dutch miede (wages), Low German mede (payment, wages, reward), German Miete (rent), Gothic [script needed] (mizdo, meed, reward, payment, recompense), Greek μισθός (misthós, wage), Old Church Slavonic мьзда (mьzda, reward).

Noun[edit]

meed (plural meeds)

  1. (now literary, archaic) A payment or recompense made for services rendered or in recognition of some achievement; reward, deserts; award.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.i:
      For well she wist, as true it was indeed, / That her liues Lord and patrone of her health / Right well deserued as his duefull meed, / Her loue, her seruice, and her vtmost wealth.
    • 1880, Richard Francis Burton, Os Lusiadas (The Lusiads), translation of original by Luís de Camões, Canto IX, stanza 93, page 358:
      Better to merit and the meed to miss,
      than, lacking merit, every meed possess.
  2. A gift; bribe.
  3. (obsolete) Merit or desert; worth.
Quotations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English meden, from Old English *mēdian (to reward, bribe), from Proto-Germanic *mizdōną (to meed), from Proto-Indo-European *mizdʰ- (to pay). Cognate with Middle Low German mēden (to reward), German mieten (to reward).

Verb[edit]

meed (third-person singular simple present meeds, present participle meeding, simple past and past participle meeded)

  1. (transitive) To reward; bribe.
  2. (transitive) To deserve; merit.

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Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

meed

  1. singular past indicative of mijden

Anagrams[edit]