sycamine

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sȳcamīnus, from Ancient Greek συκάμινον (sukáminon), from Hebrew שִׁקְמָה (shikmá, sycamore) (with assimilation to σῦκον (sûkon, fig)).

Noun[edit]

sycamine (plural sycamines)

  1. A tree, mentioned in Luke's Gospel, and thought to be the black mulberry.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke XVII:
      The lorde sayde: yf ye had fayth lyke a grayne off mustard sede, and shulde saye unto thys sycamyne tree, plucke thysilfe uppe by the rotes, and plant thysilfe in the see: he shoulde obey you.

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȳcamīne

  1. vocative singular of sȳcamīnus