toxology

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ancient Greek τόξον (tókson, bow) + -o- +‎ -logy

Noun[edit]

toxology (uncountable)

  1. (rare) Archery; or more broadly, the study of projectiles and trajectories.
    • 1843, "Illustrations of Discount" in Fraser's Magazine vol. 27, page 401 [1]:
      "We presume he is reluctant to proceed further and run the risk of exposing his well-varnished cab as a pleasing target for the poles of the loitering omnibuses, the drivers of which latter have obtained a well-earned fame for their dexterity in this diverting and innocent department of toxology."
    • 1843, Charles Henry Knox, Harry Mowbray, page 168 [2]:
      "This was provoking : the young lady blushed, looked as amiable as circumstances required,and retired, with a most sincere hope that the next essayist in toxology might have precisely the same success as herself, in which she was gratified, for Miss Jones West Jones Smith Jones Jones made to the full as bad a shot as she had done."
    • 2000, M.J. Trow, Lestrade and the Sign of Nine, ISBN 0895262460, page 29 [3]:
      "'Forgive us, Mr. Austin,' Lestrade said, 'but we are as yet unfamiliar with the toxology of the churchyard. Would the Bishop have had to pass you to reach the road?'"

Etymology 2[edit]

Omitting -ic.

Noun[edit]

toxology (uncountable)

  1. Misspelling of toxicology.
    • 1893, Louisa Parsons Hopkins, "Women in Science", in Maud Howe Elliott, ed., Art and Handicraft in the Woman's Building of the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, Goupil & Co., page 91,
      She filled the chair of chemistry and toxology in the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, and became dean of the faculty.
    • 1992, Nelson DeMille, The General's Daughter, 2002 Warner Books ed., ISBN 0446679100, page 84,
      Be sure toxology looks for sedatives.
    • 1999, Walt Mueller, Understanding Today's Youth Culture, Tyndale House, ISBN 0842377395, page 354,
      Toxology reports found that drugs and alcohol were factors in each of the three suicide stories mentioned at the beginning of this chapter.
    • 2004, William J. Coughlin, Death Penalty, St. Martin's Press, ISBN 0312933576, page 353,
      I read the report carefully, including the toxology reports concerning the blood levels.