Talk:dingleberry

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Deletion[edit]

This entry shouldn't include the link to Southern Mountain Cranberry for it has no relevance whatsoever to dingleberry. The entry should be unlocked to delete that entry. Cesaarp 17:39, 31 December 2008 (UTC)


Another slang definition[edit]

Whoever has the authority might want to add another slang use of "dingleberry", meaning "an informal, typically derrogatory, term for a BlackBerry or other similar personal communications device", and compare it to "crackberry", another slang use referring to the addictive potential of such devices, by comparing them to crack cocaine. Besides the similarity of the words BlackBerry and dingleberry, some people regard a BlackBerry, like a dingleberry, as a small piece of dung that often sticks near a person's ass. N'Awlins Contrarian 04:26, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

That appears to be a protologism. We don't include words that aren't supported by durably archived citations (such as in printed books or journals), over an extended period of time. --EncycloPetey 04:32, 10 January 2009 (UTC)

new sense[edit]

  • Michael C. Hodgins (1997) Reluctant Warrior
"You kicked some ass out there today, boy! I'll see you get a dingleberry [personal decoration] for it!" (p 177)

Cites for other senses, but lifted from Routledge Slang. Haven't traced the originals:

"At Ralph's side was his enormous, dingle-berry-decorated and constantly farting shaggy dog named Rimpoche." --John Nichols, The Nirvana Blues, 1981:36
"Some of your cruds are going to wipe just half-assed, so I do not want to see any--and I mean any--dingleberries in your skivvies." --Zelt Miller, Corps Values, 1996:114
"You fucking little dingleberry. That's what you're like, you fucking ball of shit!" --John Waters, Pink Flamingos, 1972:19

two more senses[edit]

I saw a couple of quotations, "dingleberries swinging from the window frames", "dingleberries in the window"; I would think it referred to the car ornaments (eg dice) some people hang from their rear-view mirrors, but one of the instances seemed to refer to a house window; I don't know what was meant there. I also saw this:

  • 2002, Maurice Burton, Robert Burton, The international wildlife encyclopedia:
    Dingleberries The breeding habits of the cowfish of tropical American waters are probably typical of the whole family. [...] In the United States, their rounded shape has earned them the name of dingleberries.
— Beobach972 04:14, 13 November 2010 (UTC)

RFV-passed[edit]

See this discussion. — Beobach 05:06, 21 November 2010 (UTC)

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dingleberry[edit]

Rfv-sense 3. Another name for the Southern Mountain Cranberry. I doubt it very much! -- ALGRIF talk 18:19, 31 December 2008 (UTC)

It’s listed in the Dictionary of American Regional English, so it looks like it exists. I find the other two sense more quæstionable, personally. If they do exist, are all the senses related, or do they need to be split by etymology?  (u):Raifʻhār (t):Doremítzwr﴿ 20:09, 31 December 2008 (UTC)
The "stupid person" sense is easily attested as slang [1], but I can't say what its etymology might be, or whether the senses might be etymologically related. --EncycloPetey 21:51, 1 January 2009 (UTC)
All the farmers where I used to live in Cumbria used to call a dingleberry a dingleberry, or a winnet, and a spade a spade, or a shovel. -- ALGRIF talk 11:30, 2 January 2009 (UTC)
The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang, page 55, says that the slang senses derive from the cranberry sense; I would imagine that the "stupid person" sense derives from the fecal sense. The ODMS also says that "dingleberries" can refer to the female breasts, but their citation for this looks a bit sketchy. I'd be very surprised if that could meet CFI. -- Visviva 06:18, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
Unfortunately the references in the DARE are mentions, not uses, so I don't think that's sufficient (though it is definitely worthy of note). The Range Plant Manual of 1937 may contain a use, but snippet view is not cooperating.[2] This may need to be relegated to "Etymology" if we can't get some more satisfactory attestation. -- Visviva 06:18, 21 January 2009 (UTC)
I added two quotations to the entry, which makes three. RFV-passed? I also added a few other sense-suggestions to the talk page. — Beobach972 04:16, 13 November 2010 (UTC)

Struck, tag removed, just barely RFV-passed. — Beobach972 04:43, 14 November 2010 (UTC)

Add section[edit]

Add section for pronunciation:

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɪŋgəɫbɛɹi/ invalid IPA characters (g), replace g with ɡ

Red-flagged edits[edit]

I have indicated the need for substantiation for two slang definitions. Please substitute for this pair of errant Wikipedia tags, the appropriate work-needed flags, to remove these red-flags. As the terminus of various information threads, these two definition components for these slang terms need to be substantiated as valid. Leprof 7272 (talk) 21:21, 18 November 2016 (UTC)