Talk:g'day

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In an Australian accent, wouldn't it be [gədæɪ]? --Vladisdead 03:15, 15 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Yes except [] is for narrow transcriptions, the dipthong is using non-standard symbols, and it should have a primary stress mark on the 2nd syllable: /gəˈdeɪ/, /g@"deI/. A more narrow transcription might be [gəˈdæe], [g@"d{e] (Clark); or [gəˈdæɪ], [g@"d{I] (Harrington) but neither the Macquarie Dictionary nor the Collins Australian Dictionary use either of these systems. It could also be analysed that the /ə/, /@/ is elided completely. — Hippietrail 10:10, 15 Jul 2004 (UTC)

Why the hostility to the inclusion of g'day as a New Zealand term? I think this shows nothing more than Australian ignorance. G'day has always been used in New Zealand, no less than Australia. Has anyone seen "Footrot Flats"? —This comment was unsigned.