whom're

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

whom + ’re (are)

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

whom’re

  1. (informal, interrogative) whom are
    Whom’re you talking to?
    • 1939, Irwin Shaw, Sailor off the Bremen, page 9? , :
      Whom’re you playing this week?” Ernest said.
      “Georgetown.”
    • 1943, Estelle Schrott, Heaven is for the Angels, page 65 (Appleton-Century):
      Hector clapped his hands loudly and looked around the room.
      Whom’re you applauding?” Molly asked naively.
      “Applauding? Oh — oh — ” Hector began to laugh and the others at the table joined him. “That’s the way we summon waiters and servants here,” he explained.
    • 1956, Irwin Shaw, Lucy Crown, page 296 (third edition; Random House):
      Whom’re you calling?” Tony asked.
      “Your mother.”
    • 1958, Mykhaĭlo Kot︠s︡i︠u︡bynsʹkyĭ, Chrysalis, page 16 (Foreign Languages Publishing House):
      Whom’re you talking of? What’s happened?” asked Ion.
    • 1975, Gordon Rupert Dickson, Soldier, Ask Not, page 188 (Sphere):
      Whom’re you trying to fool?’ I said. ‘Whom? I see through you just like the people on all the other worlds do! I know you know what a mumbo-jumbo your United Churches are. I know you know the way of life you sing of through your nose so much isn’t what you claim it is. I know your Eldest Bright and his gang of narrow-minded old men are just a gang of world-hungry tyrants that don’t give a damn for religion or anything as long as they get what they want. I know you know it — and I’m going to make you admit it!’
    • 1978, Hugh Gantzer, Flashpoint!, page 69 (Vikas; ISBN 0706907132, 9780706907131):
      Rohan Batra threw back his head and guffawed. “What is this?” he bellowed, “jungle thrills for tourists? First you show us a herd of tame elephants, then you get all spooky about a puddle of dirty water. And finally you weave a tale around a harmless forest guard standing in a fire-break. Come off it! Whom’re you trying to fool?”

Related terms[edit]