are

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Are, ARE, aré, arè, arë, aṛé, āre, ārē, åre, -are, -aré, and Åre

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English aren, from Old English earun, earon (are), reinforced by Old Norse plural forms in er- (displacing alternative Old English sind and bēoþ), from Proto-Germanic *arun ((they) are), from Proto-Germanic *esi/*izi (a form of Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésti (is). Cognate with Old Norse eru ((they) are) (> Icelandic eru ((they) are), Swedish är ((they) are), Danish er ((they) are)), Old English eart ((thou) art). More at art.

Alternative forms[edit]

  • ar (obsolete)

Pronunciation[edit]

Stressed
Unstressed

Verb[edit]

are

  1. second-person singular simple present of be
    Mary, where are you going?
  2. first-person plural simple present of be
    We are not coming.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)[1]:
      Here we are!
      (file)
  3. second-person plural simple present of be
    Mary and John, are you listening?
  4. third-person plural simple present of be
    They are here somewhere.
  5. (East Yorkshire, Midlands) present of be
Synonyms[edit]
  • (second-person singular): (archaic) art (used with thou)
Usage notes[edit]
  • The pronunciation /aʊɚ/ arising from confusion of "are" and "our" is rare, however it results as the latter can be elided into /ɑɹ/ in quick speech.
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

other forms of verb be

Etymology 2[edit]

From French are.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are (plural ares)

  1. (rare) An accepted (but deprecated and rarely used) SI unit of area equal to 100 square metres, or a former unit of approximately the same extent. Symbol: a.
Usage notes[edit]
  • Are is now rarely used except in its derivative hectare.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.svg Are on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English are, ore, ōr, from Old English ār (honor, worth, dignity, glory, respect, reverence, grace, favor, prosperity, benefit, help, mercy, pity, privilege), from Proto-West Germanic *aiʀu, from Proto-Germanic *aizō (respect, honour), from *ais- (to honour, respect, revere). Cognate with Dutch eer (honour, credit), German Ehre (honour, glory).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) Grace, mercy.
    To bid God's are.
    God's are is what children of God seek.
  2. (obsolete) Honour, dignity.
Usage notes[edit]

In the first sense, generally found in the phrase God's are, as in to seek God's are or bid (for) God's are.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

are inan

  1. rake

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French are, from Latin ārea.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are f (plural aren or ares)

  1. are, a unit of surface area

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Papiamentu: are

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned formation from Latin area, a piece of level ground. Doublet of aire.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are m (plural ares)

  1. an are

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Norwegian Bokmål: ar

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Variant of aere.

Noun[edit]

are m (plural ari)

  1. Archaic form of aere.

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

are f pl

  1. plural of ara

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

are

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あれ

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

ārē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of āreō

References[edit]


Lindu[edit]

Noun[edit]

are

  1. long, large sickle

Mapudungun[edit]

Noun[edit]

are (Raguileo spelling)

  1. warmth, heat

References[edit]

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Determiner[edit]

are

  1. (chiefly Kent and West Midlands) Alternative form of here (their)

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

are

  1. Alternative form of hare (hare)

Etymology 3[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. Alternative form of aren

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Perhaps from a Dutch Low Saxon or German Low German verb.

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

are (present tense arar, past tense ara, past participle ara, passive infinitive arast, present participle arande, imperative ar)

  1. (reflexive) to suit, fit

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

are

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of andre

Adjective[edit]

are

  1. (dialectal) alternative form of andre

Etymology 3[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

are

  1. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) white-tailed eagle

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

āre

  1. honor, glory, grace

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

āre

  1. dative singular of ār (messenger, herald; angel; missionary)

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *auʀā, from Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Noun[edit]

are n

  1. ear

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr: uar
    Hallig, Mooring: uur
    Helgoland: Uaar
  • Saterland Frisian: Oor
  • West Frisian: ear

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

are

  1. wow, woah
  2. yay

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

are m (plural ares)

  1. (historical) are (unit of area)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of arar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of arar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of arar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of arar

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cf. Latin habēret, habuerit. Compare Aromanian ari. See also Romanian ar, used in a periphrastic construction of the conditional.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. third-person singular present indicative of avea

See also[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English are, from Old English ār (honor, worth, dignity, glory, respect, reverence, grace, favor, prosperity, benefit, help, mercy, pity, privilege), from Proto-Germanic *aizō (respect, honour), from *ais- (to honour, respect, revere). Cognate with Dutch eer (honour, credit), German Ehre (honour, glory), Latin erus (master, professor).

Noun[edit]

are (uncountable)

  1. grace; mercy

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of arar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of arar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of arar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of arar.

Tagalog[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: a‧re
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈɾɛ/, [ʔɐˈɾɛ]

Pronoun[edit]

aré

  1. (chiefly Batangas) Alternative form of ari: this one; this
    Synonyms: (Manila) ito, (Central Luzon) ire, (Central Luzon) ere
    Ano ga are?What is this?

See also[edit]



Tangam[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tani *a-lə, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *la.

Noun[edit]

are

  1. (anatomy) foot, leg

References[edit]

  • Mark W. Post (2017) The Tangam Language: Grammar, Lexicon and Texts, →ISBN

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. (transitive) to scratch

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Toraja-Sa'dan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qazay.

Noun[edit]

are

  1. ant

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

are

  1. plural of ara