are

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See also: Are, -are, -aré, åre, aré, arë, āre, and ārē

English[edit]

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Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English aren, from Old English earun, earon(are), reinforced by Old Norse plural forms in er- (displacing alternative Old English sind and bēoþ), from Proto-Germanic *arun((they) are", originally, "(they) became), from the third person plural preterite indicative form of *iraną(to rise, be quick, become active), from Proto-Indo-European *er-, *or(w)-(to rise, lift, move). Cognate with Old Norse erun ("(they) are"; > Icelandic eru((they) are), Swedish är((they) are), Danish er((they) are)), Old English eart((thou) art). More at art.

Pronunciation[edit]

Stressed
Unstressed

Verb[edit]

are

  1. second-person singular simple present tense of be
    Mary, where are you going?
  2. first-person plural simple present tense of be
    We are not coming.
  3. second-person plural simple present tense of be
    Mary and John, are you listening?
  4. third-person plural simple present tense of be
    They are here somewhere.
  5. (East Yorkshire, Midlands) present tense of be
Synonyms[edit]
  • (second-person singular): (archaic) art (used with thou)
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English ōr, from Old English ār(honor, worth, dignity, glory, respect, reverence, grace, favor, prosperity, benefit, help, mercy, pity, privilege), from Proto-Germanic *aizō(respect, honour), from *ais-(to honour, respect, revere). Cognate with Dutch eer(honour, credit), German Ehre(honour, glory), Latin erus(master, professor).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are ‎(uncountable)

  1. (dialectal or obsolete) Grace, mercy.
    To bid God's are.
    God's are is what children of God seech and seek.
  2. (obsolete) Honor, dignity.
Usage notes[edit]

In the first sense, generally found in the phrase God's are, as inː to seek God's are or bid (for) God's are. Also found in expressions such asː "God's are be hard to find in our crazy, messed up world" and "for God's are some people might do some crazy shit, you know, like strap on a suicide vest, for example".

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French are.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

are ‎(plural ares)

  1. (rare) An accepted (but deprecated and rarely used) SI unit of area equal to 100 square metres, or a former unit of approximately the same extent. Symbol: a
Usage notes[edit]
  • Are is now rarely used except in its derivative hectare.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: they · my · were · #36: are · their · one · so

Anagrams[edit]


Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

are

  1. rake

Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

are f ‎(plural aren or ares)

  1. are, a unit of surface area

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Formed from Latin area, a piece of level ground.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Homophone: art

Noun[edit]

are m ‎(plural ares)

  1. An are

Related terms[edit]

External links[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

are f pl

  1. plural of ara

Anagrams[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

are

  1. Romaji transcription of あれ

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

ārē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of āreō

References[edit]


Mapudungun[edit]

Noun[edit]

are ‎(using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. warmth, heat

References[edit]

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Noun[edit]

are

  1. white-tailed eagle

Etymology 2[edit]

Perhaps from a Dutch Low Saxon [Term?] or German Low German [Term?] verb.

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Verb[edit]

are

  1. To suit, fit

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun 1[edit]

āre

  1. inflection of ār(honor, glory, grace):
    1. accusative singular
    2. genitive singular
    3. dative singular
    4. nominative plural accusative plural

Noun 2[edit]

āre

  1. dative singular of ār(messenger, herald; angel; missionary)

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ausô.

Noun[edit]

are n

  1. ear

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr-Amrum: uar
  • West Frisian: ear

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

are

  1. wow, woah
  2. yay

Derived terms[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

are m (plural ares)

  1. (historical) are (unit of area)

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of arar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of arar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of arar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of arar

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. third-person singular present tense form of avea.

See also[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English are, from Old English ār(honor, worth, dignity, glory, respect, reverence, grace, favor, prosperity, benefit, help, mercy, pity, privilege), from Proto-Germanic *aizō(respect, honour), from *ais-(to honour, respect, revere). Cognate with Dutch eer(honour, credit), German Ehre(honour, glory), Latin erus(master, professor).

Noun[edit]

are ‎(uncountable)

  1. Grace; mercy.

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

are

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of arar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of arar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of arar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of arar.

Venetian[edit]

Noun[edit]

are

  1. plural of ara