hare

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: haré and Hare

English[edit]

A European hare
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hɛɚ/, /heɹ/, /heə/
  • (file)
  • Homophone: hair

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hare, from Old English hara (hare), from Proto-Germanic *hasô (compare West Frisian hazze, Dutch haas, German Hase, Norwegian and Swedish hare, Icelandic heri), from Proto-Germanic *haswaz (grey) (compare Old English hasu, Middle High German heswe (pale, dull)), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱh₂s-én- (compare Welsh cannu (to whiten), ceinach (hare), Latin cānus (white), cascus (old), Old Prussian sasnis (hare), Pashto سوی(soe, hare) and Sanskrit शश (śaśa, hare)).

Noun[edit]

hare (plural hares)

  1. Any of several plant-eating animals of the family Leporidae, especially of the genus Lepus, similar to a rabbit, but larger and with longer ears.
  2. The player in a paperchase, or hare and hounds game, who leaves a trail of paper to be followed.
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Sranan Tongo: hei
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hare (third-person singular simple present hares, present participle haring, simple past and past participle hared)

  1. (intransitive) To move swiftly.
    • 2011 February 4, Gareth Roberts, “Wales 19-26 England”, in BBC[1]:
      But Wales somehow snaffled possession for fly-half Jones to send half-back partner Mike Phillips haring away with Stoddart in support.
Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English harren, harien (to drag by force, ill-treat), of uncertain origin. Compare harry, harass.

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hare (third-person singular simple present hares, present participle haring, simple past and past participle hared)

  1. (obsolete) To excite; to tease, or worry; to harry.
    • (Can we date this quote?), John Locke, Some Thoughts Concerning Education.
      To hare and rate them thus at every turn, is not to teach them, but to vex, and torment them to no purpoſe.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English hore, from Old English hār (hoar, hoary, grey, old), from Proto-Germanic *hairaz (grey). Cognate with German hehr (noble, sublime).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hare

  1. (regional) Grey, hoary; grey-haired, venerable (of people).
    a hare old man
  2. (regional) Cold, frosty (of weather).
    a hare day

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch (de) hare.

Pronoun[edit]

hare

  1. hers (that or those of her)
    Sy het my hemp aangehad en ek hare.
    She wore my shirt and I wore hers.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hari, heri (hare).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /haːrə/, [ˈhɑːɑ]

Noun[edit]

hare c (singular definite haren, plural indefinite harer)

  1. hare

Inflection[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch hare. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hare

  1. non-attributive form of haar (English: hers)
    Normally used in conjunction with the definite article de or het depending on the gender of what is being referred to.
    Die auto is de hare.That car is her one. That car is hers.
    Dat huis is het hare.That house is her one. That house is hers.
    Dat is de/het hare.That is her one. That is hers.
  2. (archaic) inflected form of haar

Derived terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hare

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はれ

Middle Dutch[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hāre

  1. inflection of hāer:
    1. feminine nominative/accusative singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hare

  1. Alternative form of hire

Pronoun[edit]

hare

  1. Alternative form of hire

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hare

  1. Alternative form of hire

References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old English hǣr.

Noun[edit]

hare

  1. Alternative form of her (hair)

Etymology 4[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hare

  1. (chiefly West Midland and Kentish dialectal) Alternative form of here (their)
References[edit]

Etymology 5[edit]

From Old English hara, from Proto-Germanic *hasô; some forms have the vowel of Old Norse heri.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hare (plural hares)

  1. A hare or its meat (lagomorph of the genus Lepus)
  2. (rare) An individual who is easily scared or frightened.
  3. (rare) A hare's skin or hide.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse *heri, from Proto-Germanic *háswa-. Compare with German Hase, Swedish hare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hare m (definite singular haren, indefinite plural harer, definite plural harene)

  1. a hare

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse *heri, from Proto-Germanic *háswa-. Akin to English hare.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hare m (definite singular haren, indefinite plural harar, definite plural harane)

  1. a mountain hare, Lepus timidus
  2. a hare, a small animal of the genus Lepus

References[edit]


Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

hare

  1. optative active singular of harati (to take away)

Rapa Nui[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *fale.

Noun[edit]

hare

  1. house

Derived terms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish hari, hæri, from Old Norse *hari, heri, from Proto-Germanic *hasô.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hare c

  1. hare

Declension[edit]

Declension of hare 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hare haren harar hararna
Genitive hares harens harars hararnas

Tetum[edit]

Noun[edit]

hare

  1. unpicked rice