hea

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See also: hea' and HEA

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Noun[edit]

hea (uncountable)

  1. Alternative spelling of hea'

Adverb[edit]

hea (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of hea'

Adjective[edit]

hea (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of hea'

Etymology 2[edit]

From Cantonese [script needed] (hea).

Adjective[edit]

hea (not comparable)

  1. (Hong Kong, slang) idle, lazy

Etymology 3[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hea (not comparable)

  1. (Hawaii, pidgin) here
    Da truck is ova hea.
    The truck is over here.

Anagrams[edit]


Chinese[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

hea

  1. (Cantonese, slang) to kill time, to hang around

Adjective[edit]

hea

  1. (Cantonese, slang) idle, lazy

Adverb[edit]

hea

  1. (Cantonese, slang) idly, lazily

References[edit]

  • 馮睎乾 (2015-02-13) , “Hea的正寫就是Hea [The correct way of writing 'hea' is just 'hea']”, in Apple Daily[1] (in Chinese), archived from the original on 2015-02-13, retrieved 2015-08-05

Estonian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Finnic *hüvä (/ˡhyvæ/)

Adjective[edit]

hea (genitive hea, partitive head, comparative parem, superlative kõige parem or parim)

  1. good
    Head ööd!
    Good night!
    Häid jõule!
    Merry Christmas!

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hea

  1. h-prothesized form of ea

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hea

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ヘア

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian , , from Proto-Germanic *hawją.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hea n (plural heaën, diminutive heake)

  1. hay

Further reading[edit]

  • hea (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English he, from Old English ,[1] from Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronoun[edit]

hea

  1. he

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN, page 27