disperse

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: dispersé

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French disperser, from Latin dispersus, past participle of dispergere (to scatter abroad, disperse), from dis- (apart) + spargere (to scatter); see sparse.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

disperse (third-person singular simple present disperses, present participle dispersing, simple past and past participle dispersed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To scatter in different directions
    The Jews are dispersed among all nations.
    • 1611 King James Bible, Proverbs xv. 7
      The lips of the wise disperse knowledge.
    • (Can we date this quote by Cowper and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Two lions, in the still, dark night, / A herd of beeves disperse.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To break up and disappear; to dissipate
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To disseminate
  4. (physics, transitive, intransitive) To separate rays of light etc. according to wavelength; to refract
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To distribute throughout

Usage notes[edit]

  • Do not confuse with the monetary word disburse, despite homophony and even a degree of semantic similarity (in which disbursed money may be dispersed among expenses). A mnemonic to help make the difference obvious (which uses a cognate of each word) is that dĭs-burs-ing is taking money out of the purse, whereas dĭ-spers-ing causes something to be sparsely scattered.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

disperse (comparative more disperse, superlative most disperse)

  1. Scattered or spread out.
    • 1998, James-Yves Roger, Technologies for the Information Society: Developments and Opportunities:
      Australia itself is a very wide and very disperse country, where the distance problems significantly affect also the "internal" customer-supplier chains.
    • 2014, Didier J. Dubois, Readings in Fuzzy Sets for Intelligent Systems, page 85:
      In particular, a very crisp quantifier such as “for all,” “there exists,” “at least 50 percent” tend to have less disperse weighting vectors while fuzzier quantifiers such as many tend to have a more disperse weighting vector.

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

disperse

  1. inflection of disperser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative
    2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. second-person singular imperative

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

disperse

  1. inflection of dispers:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

disperse

  1. Feminine plural of adjective disperso.

Noun[edit]

disperse f pl

  1. plural of dispersa

Verb 1[edit]

disperse

  1. inflection of disperdere:
    1. third-person singular past historic
    2. third-person singular past historic

Verb 2[edit]

disperse f

  1. feminine plural of disperso

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Participle[edit]

disperse

  1. vocative masculine singular of dispersus

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

disperse

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of dispersar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of dispersar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of dispersar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of dispersar

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /disˈperse/, [d̪isˈperse]

Verb[edit]

disperse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of dispersar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of dispersar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of dispersar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of dispersar.