heigh

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English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably of imitative origin. Compare hey, eh.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

heigh

  1. An exclamation designed to call attention, give encouragement, etc.
    • 1610, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 1, scene 1:
      Heigh, my hearts! Cheerly, cheerly, my hearts.

Derived terms[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hēah, from Proto-West Germanic *hauh (high), from Proto-Germanic *hauhaz (high).

Adjective[edit]

heigh (comparative heigher, superlative heighest)

  1. high
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • English: high
  • Scots: heich
  • Yola: heigh, hia

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Interjection[edit]

heigh

  1. Alternative form of hey (hey)

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

heigh (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of hey (hay)

Etymology 4[edit]

Verb[edit]

heigh (third-person singular simple present heigheth, present participle heighynge, first-/third-person singular past indicative and past participle heighed)

  1. Alternative form of hien (to go quickly)

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English heigh, from Old English hēah, from Proto-West Germanic *hauh.

Adjective[edit]

heigh

  1. high
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Heigh thoornes.
      High thorns.

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN