hy

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See also: Hy and

Afrikaans[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch hij, from Middle Dutch hi, from Old Dutch hie, , from Proto-Germanic *hiz.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɦəi/, [ɦə̟i̯]

Pronoun[edit]

hy (object hom, possessive sy)

  1. third-person singular subject pronoun
    1. he (referring to a male person)
      Hy sien my nie.
      He can’t see me.
    2. it (referring to a non-personal noun)
      Ek het die boek gelees, maar hy is baie moeilik om te volg.
      I’ve read the book, but it is very difficult to follow.

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Canela[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Northern Jê *cy 'seed' < Proto-Cerrado *cym 'seed' < Proto-Jê *cym 'seed' < Proto-Macro-Jê *cəm° 'seed'.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /hɨ/

Noun[edit]

hy

  1. seed
    Hũmre ata amji mã ampeaj kam hãn ne ampo hy ata kre.
    That man quietly peacefully plants those seeds (without shouting or arguments).
  2. penis
    Synonym: jixôt

Cornish[edit]

Determiner[edit]

hy

  1. her (possessive determiner)

Noun[edit]

hy

  1. Aspirate mutation of ky.

Pronoun[edit]

hy

  1. she
  2. her

Egyptian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hii
  1. (vocative, before the name of the person called) O, hey, hail
  2. a call to someone unspecified; hey

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hiiA2

 m

  1. cry of joy

Inflection[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

References[edit]


Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hy

  1. Alternative form of heo

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hy

  1. Alternative form of he

References[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *hiwją, either from Proto-Indo-European *kew-, *ḱew- or from Proto-Indo-European *ḱey-, or a merger of the two. Compare English hue.

Noun[edit]

hy c (uncountable)

  1. skin, complexion

Declension[edit]

Declension of hy 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative hy hyn
Genitive hys hyns

Welsh[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *segl-, from Proto-Indo-European *seǵʰ- (to overpower).[1] Cognate with Proto-Germanic *segaz, Sanskrit सहस् (sáhas, force, power, victory), and Ancient Greek ἔχω (ékhō, I have, I own).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hy (feminine singular hy, plural hyfion, equative hyfed, comparative hyfach, superlative hyfaf, not mutable)

  1. bold

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “hy”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian , from Proto-Germanic *hiz, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱe.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hy

  1. he (third-person singular masculine pronoun)

Usage notes[edit]

The accusative him is used roughly like "himself" and "itself" in English. In these cases, it is used after a verb when there is another object in the sentence. For example:

Dy partij stelt him op it stânpunt fan it federalisme.
This party puts itself on the standpoint of federalism.

In other reflexive cases, the reflexively marked pronoun himsels is used.

The clitic form er is used before the object of the sentence or after the verb, if there is one. It is never the first word of a sentence.

Doe't er in swolch naam
When he took a swallow

Especially in narrative, er is used in the past tense.

Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • hy (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hýða, derived from húð.

Verb[edit]

hy

  1. (transitive) to birch children
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Finnish.

Noun[edit]

hy f

  1. gnat, the smallest species of the mosquito genus: Ceratopogon pulicaris
Synonyms[edit]