ik

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See also: IK, Ik, ik', ik-, -ik, and -ík

English[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (Cape Afrikaans or archaic) Alternative form of ek.

Albanian[edit]

Verb[edit]

ik

  1. second-person singular imperative of iki

Angguruk Yali[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. water

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ik

  1. Alternative form of ik'

Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch ic, from Old Dutch ik, from Proto-West Germanic *ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Low German ik, West Frisian ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg. See I (English, etymology 3).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (stressed) /ɪk/, (unstressed) /ək/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ik
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I (first-person singular personal pronoun)

Inflection[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: ek
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: eke
  • Jersey Dutch: äk
  • Petjo: ik
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: ek

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN

German Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (enclitic) -'k, 'k
  • (Waldeckisch, when strongly emphasised; scientific spelling) ikə
  • ick
  • (as alternative form of ick, enclitic) 'ck
  • (as alternative form of ick, when strongly emphasised, rare) icke
  • (Eastphalia, Lippe, County of Mark, Ruhr area) ek, eck
  • (Low Prussian) öck, eck

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German ik, from Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (most northern and western dialects) I (first person singular pronoun)
    Ik kem, ik sach, ik wünd.
    I came, I saw, I conquered. (Veni, vidi, vici. Attributed to Julius Caesar.)

Declension[edit]

In Störmede:[1]

1st person 2nd person 3rd person
Masculine Feminine Neuter
Singular Nominative ik diu hoi soi iät
(Genitive) (van meune) (van deune) (van seune) (van iähre) (van seune)
Dative meu deu iähne iähr iähne
Accusative soi iät
Plural Nominative weu jeu soi
(Genitive) (van use) (van jiue) (van iähre)
Dative us jiu iähnen
Accusative soi

Related terms[edit]

  • mien (my, mine, possessive); mi (me, dative (also generally used in place of the accusative)); mik; wi pl (we)
  • Sauerländisch: mey, mik
  • Paderbornisch: mey/my, mik; plural: wey/wy

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Franz Kemper: Stürmeder Platt: Wi et lutt düt un dat. 1998, p. 18

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

ik

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌺

Kaqchikel[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. sun
  2. chili

Latvian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

ik

  1. every

Marshallese[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. Alternative spelling of ek

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old English ic, perhaps with influence from Old Norse ek; both from Proto-Germanic *ik, *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂ (I).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of I
    • circa 1300, Homilies:
      Forthi wil I of my pouert, Schau sum thing that ik haf in hert, [...]
    • circa 1300, Cursor Mundi:
      Her ik haf a litil spend, In word eftir þat ik entend, [...]
    • circa 1390, Chaucer:
      But ik am oold me list not pleye for age.

Descendants[edit]


Middle Low German[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Saxon ik, from Proto-Germanic *ik.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I (first person singular nominative)

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Dutch ik, German Low German ik, German ich, English I, Danish jeg.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Old Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *ik

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Dutch: ic
    • Dutch: ik
      • Afrikaans: ek
      • Berbice Creole Dutch: eke
      • Jersey Dutch: äk
      • Petjo: ik
      • Skepi Creole Dutch: ek

Further reading[edit]

  • ik”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Saxon ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Inflection[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • North Frisian: ick, ik
  • Saterland Frisian: iek
  • West Frisian: ik

Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂. Compare Old Frisian ik, Old English , Old Dutch ik, Old High German ih, Old Norse ek, Gothic 𐌹𐌺 (ik).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle Low German: ik, ich, ig, ek
    • German Low German: ik

Pass Valley Yali[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. water

References[edit]


Pwaamei[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. louse

References[edit]

  • Jim Hollyman, K. J. Hollyman, Études sur les langues du Nord de la Nouvelle-Calédonie (1999), page 52

Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English ik, from Old English ic (I, pronoun), from Proto-Germanic *ek (I, pronoun).

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. (rare) I. Now mostly used to be emphatical.
    Wha did that? Ik!
    Who did that? I did!
    • 1375, John Barbour, The Brus:
      For Ik am he, I say the soithly, [...]
      For I am he, I tell you truthfully, []

Synonyms[edit]

See also[edit]


Tobian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Austronesian *Sikan.

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. Fish

Alternative forms[edit]


Wastek[edit]

Noun[edit]

ik

  1. wind

References[edit]


West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian ik, from Proto-Germanic *ek, *ik, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ik

  1. I (first person singular nominative pronoun)

Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ik (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011