mien

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See also: Mien, miến, miền, miễn, and mīen

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French mine (whence also Danish mine and German Miene), appearance, perhaps from Breton min (face of an animal), or from Latin minio (to redden).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mien (countable and uncountable, plural miens)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Demeanor; facial expression or attitude, especially one which is intended by its bearer.
    • 1856, Joseph Turnley, 16px Wikisource logo The Language of the Eye, p. 111:[2]
      Beauty, like all divine gifts, is everywhere to be seen by the eye of the faithful admirer of nature; and, like all spirits, she is scarcely to be described by words. Her countenance and mien, her path, her hue and carriage, often surpass expression, and soothe the enthusiast into reverie and silence.
    • 1860, July 1860, exact date unknown (lyrics and music), “Stephen Foster”, in Jenny's coming o'er the green[1]:
      Jenny's coming o'er the green, / Fairer form was never seen, / Winning is her gentle mien; / Why do I love her so?
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, chapter 7, in The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde[2]:
      taking the air with an infinite sadness of mien, like some disconsolate prisoner, Utterson saw Dr. Jekyll.
  2. (countable) A specific facial expression.
    • 2007, February 10, “Claudia La Rocco”, in Stony Miens and Sad Hearts[3]:
      It’s hard to say which is worse: the press-on smiles favored by many a ballet dancer, or the stony “I’m going to pretend this isn’t happening to me” miens often found in contemporary troupes like White Road.

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 727, mine1
  2. ^ OCLC 11907576

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin meum, the neuter of Latin meus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /mjɛ̃/
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

mien (feminine singular mienne, masculine plural miens, feminine plural miennes)

  1. (archaic) my

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin meum.

Adjective[edit]

mien

  1. (stressed) my; mine

Usage notes[edit]

  • chiefly used after an article (un, le, etc.) and before a noun. The noun may be omitted if clear from the context
    un mien fils
    my son
    enveierai le mien
    I will send mine

Descendants[edit]


Pitcairn-Norfolk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English main.

Adjective[edit]

mien

  1. main

Plautdietsch[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

mien

  1. my

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Slovak[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mien

  1. genitive plural of mena

Noun[edit]

mien

  1. genitive plural of meno

Vilamovian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

mien f

  1. carrot