singular

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See also: Singular, singulár, and singulär

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English singuler, borrowed from Old French, from Latin singulāris (alone of its kind), from Latin singulus (single).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

singular (comparative more singular, superlative most singular)

  1. Being only one of a larger population.
    A singular experiment cannot be regarded as scientific proof of the existence of a phenomenon.
    Synonyms: individual; see also Thesaurus:specific
    Antonyms: general; see also Thesaurus:generic
  2. Being the only one of the kind; unique.
    She has a singular personality.
    Synonyms: unique; see also Thesaurus:unique
    • 1705, J[oseph] Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c. in the Years 1701, 1702, 1703, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], OCLC 1051505315:
      The busts [] of the emperors and empresses are all very scarce, and some of them almost singular in their kind.
    • (Can we clean up(+) this sense?)
      1387–1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “(please specify the story)”, in The Canterbury Tales, [Westminster: William Caxton, published 1478], OCLC 230972125; Charles Cowden Clarke, editor, The Canterbury Tales of Chaucer. [], volume (please specify |volume=I, II, or III), 2nd edition, Edinburgh: James Nichol; London: James Nisbet & Co.; Dublin: W. Robertson, 1860, OCLC 752865638:
      And God forbid that all a company / Should rue a singular manne's folly.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 1620, Francis Bacon, Novum Organum:
      singular instances
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty’s Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the Years 1826 and 1836, [], volume III, London: Henry Colburn, [], OCLC 228675426, pages 461–462:
      A group of finches, of which Mr. Gould considers there are thirteen species; and these he has distributed into for new sub-genera. These birds are the most singular of any in the archipelago.
  3. Distinguished by superiority: peerless, unmatched, eminent, exceptional, extraordinary.
    a man of singular gravity or attainments
    Synonyms: exceptional, extraordinary, remarkable
  4. Out of the ordinary; curious.
    It was very singular; I don't know why he did it.
    Synonyms: curious, eccentric, funny, odd, peculiar, rum, rummy, strange, unusual; see also Thesaurus:strange
  5. (grammar) Referring to only one thing or person.
    Antonym: plural
  6. (linear algebra, of matrix) Having no inverse.
    Synonym: non-invertible
    Antonyms: invertible, non-singular
  7. (linear algebra, of transformation) Having the property that the matrix of coefficients of the new variables has a determinant equal to zero.
  8. (set theory, of a cardinal number) Not equal to its own cofinality.
  9. (law) Each; individual.
    to convey several parcels of land, all and singular
  10. (obsolete) Engaged in by only one on a side; single.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun[edit]

singular (plural singulars)

  1. (grammar) A form of a word that refers to only one person or thing.
    Antonym: plural
  2. (logic) That which is not general; a specific determinate instance.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin singulāris. Doublet of senglar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

singular (masculine and feminine plural singulars)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin singulāris.

Adjective[edit]

singular m or f (plural singulares)

  1. (grammar) singular

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin singulāris. Doublet of senheiro.

Pronunciation[edit]

 

  • Hyphenation: sin‧gu‧lar

Adjective[edit]

singular m or f (plural singulares)

  1. singular (being the only one of a kind)
    Synonym: único
  2. (grammar) singular (referring to only one thing)
    Antonym: plural

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

singular m (plural singulares)

  1. (grammar) singular (form of a word that refers to only one thing)
    Antonym: plural

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin singularis or French singulier.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

singular m or n (feminine singular singulară, masculine plural singulari, feminine and neuter plural singulare)

  1. (grammar) singular

Declension[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin singulāris.

Noun[edit]

sȉngulār m (Cyrillic spelling си̏нгула̄р)

  1. singular
    Synonym: jednìna

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin singulāris. Doublet of señero.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sinɡuˈlaɾ/, [sĩŋ.ɡuˈlaɾ]
  • (file)

Adjective[edit]

singular (plural singulares)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural
  2. odd, peculiar

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

singular m (plural singulares)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural

Further reading[edit]