simplex

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See also: Simplex

English

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Simplexes (geometry).
Simplex wireless communication.
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Etymology

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From Latin simplex (simple).

In the mathematical sense, apparently first used (in German) in 1902, Pieter Hendrik Schoute, Mehrdimensionale Geometrie[1], where Schoute first suggests the term Simplicissimum, but then from the next page decides to use simplex "for short".[1] In his pioneering works on algebraic topology, Henri Poincaré had previously introduced the concept, but not the actual term simplex.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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simplex (not comparable)

  1. Single, simple; not complex.
  2. (telecommunications) Unidirectional.

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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  • (antonym(s) of simple): complex
  • (antonym(s) of unidirectional): duplex (bidirectional)

Coordinate terms

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(unidirectional):

Translations

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Noun

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simplex (plural simplexes or simplices or simplicia)

  1. (geometry, algebraic topology) An analogue in a space of arbitrary dimensionality of the triangle or tetrahedron; the convex hull of n+1 linearly independent points in n-dimensional space; in other words, the triangle, tetrahedron etc., generalized to an arbitrary number of dimensions.
  2. (linguistics) A monomorphemic word, one that is not compound and contains no derivational affixes (inflectional affixes are usually not counted)
    “Weak” is a simplex. Its derivative “to weaken” is not.
    • 1978, Helga Harries-Delisle, “Contrastive Emphasis and Cleft Sentences”, in Universals of Human Language, edited by Joseph H. Greenberg, →ISBN, page 460:
      The only indication that 139. is a simplex is the sentence intonation and the absence of a break between the verb and the subject.

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Translations

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See also

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References

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Latin

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Latin numbers (edit)
10[a], [b]
I
1
2  →  10  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal: ūnus
    Ordinal: prīmus
    Adverbial: semel
    Proportional: simplus
    Multiplier: simplex
    Distributive: singulus
    Collective: ūniō
    Fractional: integer

Etymology

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From Proto-Italic *sempleks, from the same root as semel +‎ -plex.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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simplex (genitive simplicis, comparative simplicior, superlative simplicissimus, adverb simpliciter); third-declension one-termination adjective

  1. single
  2. simple, plain, uncompounded
  3. pure, unmixed
  4. sincere, naive, frank, open, without guile, guileless, unsuspecting
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 2.225–226:
      male crēditis hostī: simplex nōbilitās, perfida tēla cave!
      You do wrong to trust the enemy: Guileless nobles, beware of treacherous weapons!

Declension

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Third-declension one-termination adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative simplex simplicēs simplicia
Genitive simplicis simplicium
Dative simplicī simplicibus
Accusative simplicem simplex simplicēs simplicia
Ablative simplicī simplicibus
Vocative simplex simplicēs simplicia

Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  • simplex”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • simplex”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • simplex in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • simplex in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French simplex.

Noun

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simplex n (uncountable)

  1. simplex

Declension

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