pure

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See also: puré, purè, and purê

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pur, from Old French pur, from Latin purus(clean, free from dirt or filth, unmixed, plain), from Proto-Indo-European *peu-, *pu-(to cleanse, purify). Displaced native Middle English lutter(pure, clear, sincere) (from Old English hlūtor, hluttor), Middle English skere(pure, sheer, clear) (from Old English scǣre and Old Norse skǣr), Middle English schir(clear, pure) (from Old English scīr), Middle English smete, smeate(pure, refined) (from Old English smǣte; compare Old English mǣre(pure)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pure ‎(comparative purer or more pure, superlative purest or most pure)

  1. Free of flaws or imperfections; unsullied.
    • Thomas Macaulay (1800-1859)
      Such was the origin of a friendship as warm and pure as any that ancient or modern history records.
  2. Free of foreign material or pollutants.
    • Isaac Watts (1674-1748)
      A guinea is pure gold if it has in it no alloy.
  3. Free of immoral behavior or qualities; clean.
  4. (of a branch of science) Done for its own sake instead of serving another branch of science.
    • 2014 June 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892:
      The [Isaac] Newton that emerges from the [unpublished] manuscripts is far from the popular image of a rational practitioner of cold and pure reason. The architect of modern science was himself not very modern. He was obsessed with alchemy.
  5. (phonetics) Of a single, simple sound or tone; said of some vowels and the unaspirated consonants.
  6. (of sound) Without harmonics or overtones; not harsh or discordant.
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Adverb[edit]

pure ‎(comparative more pure, superlative most pure)

  1. (Liverpudlian) to a great extent or degree; extremely; exceedingly.
    You’re pure busy.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pure ‎(uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of puer
    • 1851, H. Mayhew, London Labour and the London poor, vII. 142/1:
      [] Dogs'-dung is called ‘Pure’, from its cleansing and purifying properties.
    • 1842, The Penny Magazine, May 212/1:
      [] A solution called the ‘pure’ or the 'pewer' (having never seen the word written.., we must spell it as pronounced) is prepared in a large vessel, and into this the skins are immersed.

External links[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pūre, the adverb of pūrus(clean, pure); or the definite form of pur(pure).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /puːrə/, [ˈpʰuːɐ̯]

Adjective[edit]

pure

  1. complete
  2. (adverbial) completely
Inflection[edit]
Inflection of pure
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular pure 2
Neuter singular pure 2
Plural pure 2
Definite attributive1 pure
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Etymology 2[edit]

From French purée(puree).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pyre/, [pʰyˈʁæ]

Noun[edit]

pure c (singular definite pureen, plural indefinite pureer)

  1. puree
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Non-lemma forms.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /puːrə/, [ˈpʰuːɐ̯]

Adjective[edit]

pure

  1. definite of pur
  2. plural of pur

Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pure

  1. purely

Finnish[edit]

Verb[edit]

pure

  1. Indicative present connegative form of purra.
  2. Second-person singular imperative present form of purra.
  3. Second-person singular imperative present connegative form of purra.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pure

  1. feminine singular of pur

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pure

  1. inflected form of pur

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pure f pl

  1. feminine plural of puro

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin pūrē, the adverb of pūrus.[1]

Adverb[edit]

pure

  1. too, also, as well
  2. well, surely
  3. please, by all means
  4. if you like; if you want (etc.)
    (with third-person subjunctive) Parli pure‎ ― let him speak if he likes
    (with imperative) Parla pure‎ ― Speak if you like
    (with formal subjunctive-imperative) Lei parli pure‎ ― Speak if you like
Synonyms[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

pure

  1. even though, even if, although
  2. nevertheless

References[edit]

  1. ^ Angelo Prati, "Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano", Torino, 1951; headword pure

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From pūrus(clean; pure) and -e(-ly, -ily).

Adverb[edit]

pūrē

  1. clearly, brightly, cleanly
  2. correctly, faultlessly, perfectly, purely syn.
    Loqui pure.
    To speak correctly.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

pūre

  1. ablative singular of pūs

References[edit]

  • pure in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pure in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) logic, dialectic: dialectica (-ae or -orum) (pure Latin disserendi ratio et scientia)
    • (ambiguous) astronomy: astrologia (pure Latin sidera, caelestia)

Rapa Nui[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Polynesian *pule.

Noun[edit]

pure

  1. cowrie

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pure

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of pur.