pur

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See also: PUR and pür

English[edit]

Noun[edit]

pur (plural purs)

  1. Dated form of purr (low murmuring sound as of a cat)
    • 1895, Jacob Mendes Da Costa, Medical diagnosis (page 294)
      The first — called by Laennec, from its resemblance to the pur of a cat, the purring tremor — is nearly always indicative of a valvular lesion. The second is caused by the to-and-fro motion of a roughened pericardium.

Verb[edit]

pur (third-person singular simple present purs, present participle purring, simple past and past participle purred)

  1. Dated form of purr
    • John G. C. Brainard
      And there the wild-cat purs amid her brood.
    • 1840, The Visitor: Or, Monthly Instructor (page 182)
      It appears to me, past all doubt, that its [the goatsucker's] notes are formed by organic impulse, by the parts of its windpipe formed for sound, just as cats pur.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin purus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pur m (feminine pura, masculine plural purs, feminine plural pures)

  1. pure
  2. not contaminated
  3. innocent
  4. authentic, genuine

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin purus

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pur m (feminine pure, masculine plural purs, feminine plural pures)

  1. pure (unspoilt)
  2. pure (undiluted)

Derived terms[edit]

External links[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Latin pūrus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pur (comparative purer, superlative am pursten)

  1. pure (free of flaws or imperfections)

Declension[edit]

External links[edit]

  • pur in Duden online

Interlingua[edit]

Adjective[edit]

pur (comparative plus pur, superlative le plus pur)

  1. pure

Italian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pur

  1. apocopic form of pure

Conjunction[edit]

pur

  1. apocopic form of pure

Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

pur

  1. rafsi of purci.

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French pur, from Latin pūrus.

Adjective[edit]

pur m (f puthe, m plural purs, f plural puthes)

  1. (Jersey) pure

Derived terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Latin purus

Adjective[edit]

pur m (feminine pure)

  1. pure
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See por

Preposition[edit]

pur

  1. alternative form of por

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pūrus.

Adjective[edit]

pur

  1. pure, clean, clear
  2. mere

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Latin porrum.

Noun[edit]

pur m (plural puri)

  1. sand leek (Allium rotundum)
  2. serpent's garlic

Romansch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin pūrus

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Puter, Vallader) pür

Adjective[edit]

pur m (feminine pura, masculine plural purs, feminine plural puras)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) pure
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Of Germanic origin, cognate with German Bauer, Dutch boer.

Noun[edit]

pur m (plural purs)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter) peasant, farmer
  2. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader, chess) pawn
Alternative forms[edit]
  • (Surmiran) pour
  • (Vallader) paur (peasant, farmer)

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin purus

Adjective[edit]

pur

  1. (somewhat dated) pure

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]