den

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English den, from Old English denn (den, lair (of a beast), cave; a swine-pasture, a woodland pasture for swine), from Proto-West Germanic *dani (threshing-floor, barn-floor). Cognate with Scots den (den, lair), Middle Dutch denne (burrow, den, cave, attic), Dutch den (ship's deck, threshing-floor, mountain floor), Middle Low German denne, danne (threshing-floor, small dale), German Tenne (threshing-floor, barn for threshing).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

den (plural dens)

  1. A small cavern or hollow place in the side of a hill, or among rocks; especially, a cave used by a wild animal for shelter or concealment.
    a den of robbers
    Daniel was put into the lions’ den.
  2. A squalid or wretched place; a haunt.
    a den of vice
    an opium den; a gambling den
  3. A comfortable room not used for formal entertaining.
    Synonym: family room
  4. Synonym of fort (structure improvised from furniture, etc. for playing games.)
    Our little girls love using bedsheets and other stuff around the house to make dens in the living room and pretending they're on adventures.
  5. (UK, Scotland, obsolete) A narrow glen; a ravine; a dell.
    • 1806, Sir William Forbes, An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, LL.D., including many of his Original Letters:
      I have made several visits of late to the Den of Rubislaw
  6. A group of Cub Scouts of the same age who work on projects together.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

den (third-person singular simple present dens, present participle denning, simple past and past participle denned)

  1. (reflexive) To ensconce or hide oneself in (or as in) a den.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French denier, from Latin denarius.

Noun[edit]

den

  1. Abbreviation of denier (a unit of weight)

Etymology 3[edit]

Adverb[edit]

den (not comparable)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of then, representing AAVE, Bermuda English.

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch den

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /dɛn/

Noun[edit]

den (plural denne)

  1. pine (tree)

Akan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

den

  1. (Twi) hard
    nsa denthe hand is hard[2]

Related terms[edit]

(Nouns)

(Adverbs)

(Adjectives)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kotey, Paul A. (1998). Twi-English/English-Twi Dictionary. New York: Hippocrene Books. →ISBN
  2. ^ Dolphyne, Florence Abena (1996) A Comprehensive Course in Twi (Asante) for the Non-Twi Learner[1], Accra, Ghana: Ghana Universities Press, →ISBN, page 123

Bambara[edit]

Noun[edit]

den

  1. child
  2. fruit

Derived terms[edit]

(Sense 1)

Verb[edit]

den (intransitive)

  1. to bear fruit

Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *dün, from Proto-Celtic *gdonyos (human, person), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéǵʰom-yo- (earthling, human), a derivation of *dʰéǵʰōm (earth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

den m

  1. human being
  2. person, man
  3. husband

Cimbrian[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den

  1. inflection of dèar:
    1. accusative singular masculine
    2. dative plural

Determiner[edit]

den

  1. inflection of dèar:
    1. accusative singular masculine
    2. dative plural

See also[edit]

Declension of dèar
masculine feminine neuter plural
nominative dèar dòi des dii / zòi
accusative den dòi des dii / zòi
dative dèmme dèar dèmme den

Further reading[edit]

  • “den” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *dün, from Proto-Celtic *gdonyos (human, person), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéǵʰom-yo- (earthling, human), a derivation of *dʰéǵʰōm (earth).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Revived Middle Cornish) IPA(key): [dɛːn]
  • (Revived Late Cornish) IPA(key): [deːn]

Noun[edit]

den m (plural tus)

  1. man
  2. person

Mutation[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Czech den, from Proto-Slavic *dьnь (day).

Noun[edit]

den m inan

  1. day (24 hours, usually from midnight to midnight)
    Jednoho dneone day, someday
    Jednoho dne chytíThey're gonna catch you one day
    po několika dnechAfter a few days
    za pár dníin a couple of days
  1. daytime (time between sunrise and sunset)
  2. (astronomy) day (rotational period of a body orbiting a star)
    Den na Merkuru trvá téměř 59 pozemských dní.A day on Mercury lasts almost 59 terrestrial days.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

den

  1. genitive plural of dno

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun[edit]

den

  1. genitive plural of dna

Anagrams[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • den in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • den in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse þann, the accusative form of , from Proto-Germanic *sa (that), from Proto-Indo-European *só (this, that).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɛnˀ/, [ˈd̥ɛnˀ], [d̥ɛn], [d̥n̩], [pm̩]

Article[edit]

den c (neuter det, plural de)

  1. (definite) the (used before an adjective preceding a noun)
    bilen - the car; den røde bil - the red car

See also[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den c (neuter det, plural de)

  1. (demonstrative) that, the
  2. (personal) it

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Dutch dan, danne, denne (pine tree), from Proto-West Germanic *dannā (pine tree). Cognate with German Tanne.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

den m (plural dennen, diminutive dennetje n)

  1. pine, pine tree
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Dutch den.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɛn/, /dən/
  • Hyphenation: den
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Article[edit]

den (definite)

  1. (archaic) Dative masculine, neuter, and plural of the definite article.
    Nederland in den goeden ouden tijd. — The Netherlands in the days of yore.
    De baron gaf den koetsier een wenk en het rijtuig rolde heen. — The baron gave the coachman a sign and the carriage rode away. (from the story Gaston von Frankrijk by J.J.A. Goeverneur)
    In den beginne schiep God den hemel en de aarde — In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth
  2. (archaic) Accusative singular masculine of the definite article.
  3. (Southern, dialectal) Masculine singular of the definite article, alternative form of de.
Usage notes[edit]
  • The distinction of the dative case, which had long been frail and without any basis in actual speech, widely fell out of use over the course of the 19th century. The use of den for the masculine object case, however, remained usual in the written language until the spelling reform of 1947. Since then only de is generally used in standard Dutch. Den survives in idiomatic expressions, including surnames (e.g. Van den Berg).
  • In Flemish, Brabantian, and Limburgish dialects and vernaculars, den is still widely used with masculine nouns, but without any case distinction. Often den is used before vowels and certain consonants, while de is used before other consonants.
  • The now common pronunciation /dɛn/ is a spelling pronunciation. Before the word became archaic—and still in those lects where it is not archaic—it has been pronounced with a schwa, /dən/.
Inflection[edit]
Dutch definite article
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative de de het de
Genitive des der des der
Dative den der den den
Accusative den de het de


Derived terms[edit]

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Article[edit]

den (definite)

  1. inflection of der (the):
    1. accusative masculine singular
    2. dative plural

Declension[edit]

German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative der die das die
Genitive des der des der
Dative dem der dem den
Accusative den die das die

Pronoun[edit]

den

  1. that; whom; accusative masculine singular of der

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

den

  1. Contraction of de an.
    Bhris mé den chrann é.I broke it off the tree.
    Fuair sé bás den ocras.He died of hunger.

Usage notes[edit]

This contraction is obligatory, i.e. *de an never appears uncontracted. It triggers lenition of a following consonant other than d, s, or t.

Related terms[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

den

  1. Rōmaji transcription of でん

Luxembourgish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

den m

  1. unstressed form of deen

Declension[edit]

Luxembourgish definite articles
masculine feminine neuter plural
nom./acc. deen (den) déi (d') dat (d') déi (d')
dative deem (dem) där (der) deem (dem) deen (den)

Malay[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den (Jawi spelling دين‎)

  1. I, me, my

See also[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

den

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dèn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch[edit]

Article[edit]

den

  1. inflection of die:
    1. masculine accusative/dative singular
    2. neuter dative singular
    3. dative plural

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English denn, from Proto-West Germanic *dani. Forms with a final vowel are probably generalised datives.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /dɛn/, /ˈdɛn(ə)/

Noun[edit]

den (plural dennes)

  1. A cave or cavern.
  2. A chamber of residence:
    1. A den (animal lair)
      • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[2], published c. 1410, Matheu 8:20, page 3v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
        and iheſus ſeide to him / foxis han dennes ⁊ bꝛiddis of heuene han neeſtis .· but mannes ſone haþ not where he ſchal reſte his heed
        But Jesus said to him, "Foxes have dens and the birds up above have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere he can rest his head."
    2. A refuge; a shelter.
  3. A catacomb (subterranean grave)
  4. (anatomy) A cavity; a division.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: den
  • Scots: den
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Anglo-Norman deen and continental Old French deien, from Latin decānus.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

den (plural denes)

  1. A dean (ecclesiastical official)
  2. A leader of a group of ten.
  3. A officer of a guild.
  4. (rare, by extension) A leader of a group].
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Noun[edit]

den

  1. Alternative form of dene

Etymology 4[edit]

Noun[edit]

den

  1. Alternative form of deyne

Etymology 5[edit]

Noun[edit]

den

  1. Alternative form of dynne

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (stressed) /ˈdɛn/, (unstressed) /dən/

Pronoun[edit]

den (genitive dens)

  1. it; third person singular, masculine/feminine gender. Nominative, accusative or dative.

Pronoun[edit]

den m or f

  1. (demonstrative pronoun) that

Article[edit]

den m or f

  1. The; only used if there is an adjective in front of the noun.
    bilen: the car → den røde bilen: the red car

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse þann, þenn, masculine accusative singular of , from Proto-Germanic *sa, from Proto-Indo-European *só.

Pronunciation[edit]

Determiner[edit]

den m or f (neuter singular det, plural dei)

  1. (demonstrative determiner) that
    Eg vil ha den bilen.
    I want that car.

Derived terms[edit]

Article[edit]

den m or f (neuter singular det, plural dei)

  1. the; only used if there is an adjective or numeral to the noun
    Han køyrde den raude bilen.
    He drove the red car.

Declension[edit]


Usage notes[edit]

  • Usually put preceding the noun. In some rare cases of poetry, the article may come after the noun.
  • The noun is nearly always in its definite form. Exceptions include fixed expressions and poetry. Attributive adjectives are always in their definite forms.
  • May be omitted when used with the determiner same, used with an ordinal number, or an adjective denotes an inherent or natural attribute of the thing. Omission occurs more frequently, colloquially, in certain dialects.
    same tingen[the] same thing
    fyrste kvelden[the] first night
    svarte natta[the] dark night

Derived terms[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den

  1. (demonstrative pronoun) that one
    Eg vil ha den.
    I want that one.

References[edit]

  • “den” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “den”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016
  • “den” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese dentro and Spanish dentro and Kabuverdianu dentu.

Preposition[edit]

den

  1. in
  2. inside
  3. below

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

den n

  1. genitive plural of dno

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

den

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present subjunctive form of dar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present subjunctive form of dar.
  3. Second-person plural (ustedes) imperative form of dar.

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English them.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den

  1. they
  2. them

Determiner[edit]

den

  1. their (possessive pronoun)

Article[edit]

den

  1. the (plural definite article)

Swedish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish þæn, accusative of sā(r), from Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *sa, from Proto-Indo-European *só.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

den c

  1. it
  2. that
  3. he or she

Declension[edit]

Article[edit]

den c (definite)

  1. (before an adjective preceding a noun) the
    den röda bilenthe red car

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]