ham

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See also: Ham, HAM, Häm, häm, hám, and häm

English[edit]

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A baked ham (cured thigh of hog)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English hamme, from Old English hamm ‎(inner or hind part of the knee, ham), from Proto-Germanic *hamō, *hammō, *hanmō, from Proto-Indo-European *kanam-, *knāmā ‎(thigh, shin). Cognate with Dutch ham ‎(ham), dialectal German Hamme ‎(hind part of the knee, ham), dialectal Swedish ham ‎(the hind part of the knee), Icelandic höm ‎(the ham or haunch of a horse), Middle Irish cnáim ‎(bone), Ancient Greek κνήμη ‎(knḗmē, shinbone). Compare gammon.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ham ‎(plural hams)

  1. (anatomy) The region back of the knee joint; the popliteal space; the hock.
  2. (countable) A thigh and buttock of an animal slaughtered for meat.
  3. (uncountable) Meat from the thigh of a hog cured for food.
    a little piece of ham for the cat
    • (Can we date this quote?), Audra Lilly Griffeth, A King's Daughter (ISBN 146915532X):
      She put some ham in the beans and cut up some sweet potatoes to boil.
  4. The back of the thigh.
  5. (Internet, informal) Electronic mail that is wanted; mail that is not spam or junk mail.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English hām.

Noun[edit]

ham ‎(uncountable)

  1. obsolete spelling of home

Usage notes[edit]

  • Persists in many old place names, such as Buckingham.

References[edit]

  • ham” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Etymology 3[edit]

Shortened from hamfatter ‎(inferior actor), said to derive from the 1863 minstrel show song The Ham-fat Man.[1]

Noun[edit]

ham ‎(plural hams)

  1. An overacting or amateurish performer; an actor with an especially showy or exaggerated style.
  2. An amateur radio operator.
Related terms[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

ham ‎(third-person singular simple present hams, present participle hamming, simple past and past participle hammed)

  1. To overact; to act with exaggerated emotions.
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ham", Online Etymology Dictionary

Catalan[edit]

Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia ca

Etymology[edit]

From Latin hamus.

Noun[edit]

ham m ‎(plural hams)

  1. fishhook

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hamr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ham c (singular definite hammen, plural indefinite hamme)

  1. slough, skin
Derived terms[edit]
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See han.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ham

  1. (personal) objective case of han
See also[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hamō, *hammō, *hanmō, from Proto-Indo-European *kanam-, *knāmā ‎(thigh, shin).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ham f ‎(plural hammen, diminutive hammetje n)

  1. ham

Fyer[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Gerka ram ‎(water).

Noun[edit]

ham

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian, volume 3: m- (2007, ISBN 9789004164123), page 201:
    [] we should carefully distinguish the following Ch. roots from AA *m-ˀ "water" [GT]:
    (1) Ch. *h-m "water" [GT]: WCh. *hama [Stl.]: AS *ham (Gmy. *hām) [GT 2004, 153] = *am [Stl. 1977] = *ham [Dlg.] = *ham [Stl. 1987]: [] Ron *ham [GT]: Fyer & Bks. & DB & Sha ham, Klr. ˀaàm []
  • Václav Blažek, A Lexicostatitical comparison of Omotic languages, in In Hot Pursuit of Language in Prehistory: Essays in the four fields of anthropology, page 122

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [haːmˠ], [hamˠ]

Noun[edit]

ham m

  1. h-prothesized form of am

Middle English[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ham

  1. them

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

ham m (plural hams)

  1. village

Montol[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Sura am ‎(water).

Noun[edit]

hàm

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian, volume 3: m- (2007, ISBN 9789004164123), page 201:
    [] we should carefully distinguish the following Ch. roots from AA *m-ˀ "water" [GT]:
    (1) Ch. *h-m "water" [GT]: WCh. *hama [Stl.]: AS *ham (Gmy. *hām) [GT 2004, 153] = *am [Stl. 1977] = *ham [Dlg.] = *ham [Stl. 1987]: [] Tal hàm [Jng./JI], Mnt. hàm "Wasser" [Jng. 1965, 171], []

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

ham

  1. him

Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hamō-. Cognate with Middle Dutch hamme (Dutch ham), Old High German hamma (dialectal German Hamm), Old Norse hǫm.

Noun[edit]

ham f

  1. (anatomy) ham, inner knee
    Monegum men gescrincaþ his fet to his homme: with many men the feet shrink up to the knee. (Leechbook)
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hammaz. Cognate with Old Frisian ham, Middle Low German hamme (Low German Hamm).

Noun[edit]

ham m

  1. enclosure, especially an enclosed pasture or dwelling

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *haimaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kōim- ‎(village), *ḱóymos, *(t)ḱoimos. Cognate with Old Frisian hām (West Frisian hiem), Old Saxon hēm, Frankish *haim (Dutch heem), Old High German heim (German Heim), Old Norse heimr (Swedish hem, Danish hjem), Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐌼𐍃 ‎(haims). The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek κωμη ‎(komi), Old Irish cóim, Lithuanian šeimà, Russian семья ‎(semʹja).

Noun[edit]

hām m

  1. home, house; property, estate
    Hælend com to Lazares ham: the Saviour came to the home of Lazarus.
Declension[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Of Germanic origin, probably Frankish

Noun[edit]

ham m ‎(oblique plural hans, nominative singular hans, nominative plural ham)

  1. village

Derived terms[edit]


Rohingya[edit]

Noun[edit]

ham

  1. work

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Interjection[edit]

ham!

  1. woof, the sound a barking dog makes

See also[edit]


Ron[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Gerka ram ‎(water).

Noun[edit]

ham

  1. (all dialects, including Bokkos, Daffo-Butura, Shagawu) water

References[edit]

  • Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian, volume 3: m- (2007, ISBN 9789004164123), page 201:
    [] we should carefully distinguish the following Ch. roots from AA *m-ˀ "water" [GT]:
    (1) Ch. *h-m "water" [GT]: WCh. *hama [Stl.]: AS *ham (Gmy. *hām) [GT 2004, 153] = *am [Stl. 1977] = *ham [Dlg.] = *ham [Stl. 1987]: [] Ron *ham [GT]: Fyer & Bks. & DB & Sha ham, Klr. ˀaàm []

Tal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Sura am ‎(water).

Noun[edit]

hàm

  1. water

References[edit]

  • Etymological Dictionary of Egyptian, volume 3: m- (2007, ISBN 9789004164123), page 201:
    [] we should carefully distinguish the following Ch. roots from AA *m-ˀ "water" [GT]:
    (1) Ch. *h-m "water" [GT]: WCh. *hama [Stl.]: AS *ham (Gmy. *hām) [GT 2004, 153] = *am [Stl. 1977] = *ham [Dlg.] = *ham [Stl. 1987]: [] Tal hàm [Jng./JI], Mnt. hàm "Wasser" [Jng. 1965, 171], []

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Persian خام ‎(xâm).

Adjective[edit]

ham (comparative daha ham, superlative en ham)

  1. raw