han

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English han, contraction of haven.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /hæn/, /heɪn/
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /hən/
  • Rhymes: -æn, -eɪn, -ən

Verb[edit]

han

  1. (obsolete) plural simple present of have

Etymology 2[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Korean 한(恨) (han), from Middle Chinese (MC ɦənH).

Noun[edit]

han (uncountable)

  1. Resentment, as a part of the Korean cultural identity.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Albanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

han m (indefinite plural hane, definite singular hani, definite plural hanet)

  1. (archaic) roadside shelter for travellers and their animals: roadside hostelry, caravanserai, inn
  2. (pejorative) fleabag hotel
  3. messy place with no control of who comes and who leaves, regular flophouse

Basque[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): (Southern) /an/, [ãn]
  • IPA(key): (Northern) /han/, [ɦãn]

Adverb[edit]

han (not comparable)

  1. there (away from the speaker and the listener)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • "han" in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], euskaltzaindia.eus
  • han” in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], euskaltzaindia.eus

Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

han

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of haver

Central Franconian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • hann (most dialects)

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German hān, from Old High German havēn, northern variant of habēn, from Proto-West Germanic *habbjan.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

han (irregular, third-person singular present hat, past tense hauw, past participle jehad, past subjunctive häu)

  1. (westernmost Ripuarian and Kölsch, auxiliary, with a past participle) to have (forms the perfect and past perfect tense)
  2. (same dialects, transitive) to have; to own (to possess, have ownership of; to possess a certain characteristic)
  3. (same dialects, transitive) to have; to hold (to contain within itself/oneself)
    Uur hat doa Floep va.
    You are afraid of that.
    (literally, “You have fear of that.”)
  4. (same dialects, transitive) to have, get (to obtain, acquire)
  5. (same dialects, transitive) to get (to receive)
  6. (same dialects, transitive) to have (to be afflicted with, suffer from)
  7. (same dialects, transitive, of units of measure) to contain, be composed of, equal
    Ing Menuut hat 60 Sekonde.
    There are 60 seconds in one minute.
    (literally, “One minute has 60 seconds.”)
  8. (same dialects, impersonal, with het or 't) there be, there is, there are
  9. (same dialects, with 't and mit) to be occupied with, to like, to be into
    Iech han't nit zoeë mit Höng.
    I'm not a great fan of dogs.
    (literally, “I don't have it that much with dogs.”)
  10. (same dialects, with 't and uvver) to talk about
    Vier hauwe't juus uvver dienge Vrunk.
    We were just talking about your friend.
    (literally, “We just had it about your friend.”)

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • “han” in d'r nuie Kirchröadsjer Dieksiejoneer 2nd ed., 2017.

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

han f

  1. genitive plural of hana

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hann (dative hánum).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

han (genitive hans, accusative ham)

  1. he

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

han c (singular definite hannen, plural indefinite hanner)

  1. male, he

Inflection[edit]

References[edit]


Galician[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

han

  1. third-person plural present indicative of haber

German[edit]

Verb[edit]

han

  1. (archaic or dialectal) Alternative form of haben
    • 1812, Brothers Grimm, Kinder- und Haus-Märchen, p.138 - Der gescheidte Hans
      Hansens Mutter spricht: „wohin Hans?“ Hans antwortet: „zur Grethel.“ – „Machs gut Hans“ – „Schon gut machen, Adies, Mutter“ – Hans kommt zur Grethel: „guten Tag Grethel.“ – „Guten Hans: was bringst du Gutes?“ – „Bring nichts, gegeben han.“
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Gun[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hàn

  1. song
    Synonym: òhàn

Derived terms[edit]


Gwich'in[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Cognate with Tlingit héen (water, river).

Noun[edit]

han

  1. river

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

han

  1. Rōmaji transcription of はん

Kaingang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

han (singular)

  1. (transitive) to do; to make
  2. (auxiliary) forms verbs from nouns
    asĩg han
    to sneeze

Khasi[edit]

Noun[edit]

han

  1. duck

Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

han

  1. Nonstandard spelling of hān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of hán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of hǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of hàn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Contracted infinitive and plural present of haven.

Verb[edit]

han

  1. (transitive) Alternative form of haven - Piers Plowman.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Geoffrey Chaucer, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Him thanken all, and thus they han an end
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hampr.

Noun[edit]

han m (plural hans)

  1. (Jersey) galangal

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

han

  1. this
    Synonym: ev

References[edit]

  • Chyet, Michael L. (2003), “han”, in Kurdish–English Dictionary, with selected etymologies by Martin Schwartz, New Haven and London: Yale University Press

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hann.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

han

  1. he, him

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hann.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

han

  1. he, him, it (third person singular, masculine)

Usage notes[edit]

Han is used to refer not only to masculine persons, but any masculine noun. E.g.: Bilen er fin. Eg likar han. - The car is nice. I like it.

See also[edit]


References[edit]


Old Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hann.

Pronoun[edit]

han

  1. he / it (masculine nominative pronoun)

Descendants[edit]

  • Danish: han

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hann.

Pronoun[edit]

han

  1. he

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Adjective[edit]

han (invariable)

  1. Han Chinese (referring to the largest ethnic group indigenous to China)

Noun[edit]

han m (plural han or hans)

  1. Han Chinese (member of the largest ethnic group indigenous to China)

Rohingya[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

han

  1. ear

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish خان(han), from Persian خان(xân, caravanserai), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wes- (to dwell).

Noun[edit]

han n (plural hanuri)

  1. inn, caravanserai

Declension[edit]

References[edit]


Samoan Plantation Pidgin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hand.

Noun[edit]

han

  1. arm
  2. hand

Usage notes[edit]

Only used to refer to a human; for an animal, the equivalent parts are all labelled as lek.

References[edit]

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)
  • Mühlhäusler, Peter (1983). "Samoan Plantation Pidgin English and the origin of New Guinea Pidgin", in Ellen Woolford and William Washabaugh: The Social Context of Creolization, 28–76.

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish خان(han), from Persian خان(xan, caravanserai).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

hȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ха̑н)

  1. inn

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

han

  1. third-person plural present indicative of haber

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Swedish han, from Old Norse hann, from Proto-Norse *hānaʀ (*hānaʀ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

han

  1. he, the third person singular, masculine, nominative case.
    Han är mycket stilig
    He is very handsome
  2. (non-standard in writing, common in speech) him
    Jag såg han / Jag såg'an
    I saw him
    Synonym: (standard) honom

Declension[edit]


Tetum[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kaən, compare Malay makan.

Verb[edit]

han

  1. to eat

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English hand.

Noun[edit]

han

  1. hand
  2. arm
  3. foreleg (of an animal)
  4. wing (of a bird)
  5. branch (of a tree)
  6. branch (figurative)

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)
  • Mühlhäusler, Peter (1983). "Samoan Plantation Pidgin English and the origin of New Guinea Pidgin", in Ellen Woolford and William Washabaugh: The Social Context of Creolization, 28–76.

Turkish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish خان(han), probably of central Asian origin. Doublet of kağan and hakan.

Noun[edit]

han (definite accusative hanı, plural hanlar)

  1. khan

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish خان(han), from Persian خان(xân, caravanserai).

Noun[edit]

han (definite accusative hanı, plural hanlar)

  1. inn (for caravans)

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier cây) han

  1. Dendrocnide

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Anagrams[edit]