sit

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: SIT, Sit, sít, šit, -sít, -šit, síť, šít, and шит

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: sĭt, IPA(key): /sɪt/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sitten, from Old English sittan, from Proto-West Germanic *sittjan, from Proto-Germanic *sitjaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (sit).

Verb[edit]

sit (third-person singular simple present sits, present participle sitting, simple past sat or (dated, poetic) sate, past participle sat or (archaic, dialectal) sitten)

A painting of a man sitting.
  1. (intransitive, copulative, of a person) To be in a position in which the upper body is upright and supported by the buttocks.
    • 1460-1500, The Towneley Playsː
      He is so fair, without lease, he seems full well to sit on this.
    After a long day of walking, it was good just to sit and relax.
    Jim's pet parrot sat on his left shoulder.
  2. (intransitive, of a person) To move oneself into such a position.
    I asked him to sit.
  3. (intransitive, of an object) To occupy a given position permanently.
    The temple has sat atop that hill for centuries.
  4. (intransitive, copulative) To remain in a state of repose; to rest; to abide; to rest in any position or condition.
  5. (government) To be a member of a deliberative body.
    I currently sit on a standards committee.
  6. (law, government) Of a legislative or, especially, a judicial body such as a court, to be in session.
    In what city is the circuit court sitting for this session.
  7. To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh.
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      The calamity sits heavy on us.
  8. To be adjusted; to fit.
    Your new coat sits well.
  9. (intransitive, of an agreement or arrangement) To be accepted or acceptable; to work.
    How will this new contract sit with the workers?
    I don’t think it will sit well.
    The violence in these video games sits awkwardly with their stated aim of educating children.
  10. (transitive, causative) To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to.
    Sit him in front of the TV and he might watch for hours.
  11. (transitive) To accommodate in seats; to seat.
    The dining room table sits eight comfortably.
  12. (US, transitive, intransitive) To babysit.
    I'm going to sit for them on Thursday.
    I need to find someone to sit my kids on Friday evening for four hours.
  13. (transitive, Australia, New Zealand, Britain) To take, to undergo or complete (an examination or test).
  14. To cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to brood; to incubate.
  15. To take a position for the purpose of having some artistic representation of oneself made, such as a picture or a bust.
    I'm sitting for a painter this evening.
  16. To have position, as at the point blown from; to hold a relative position; to have direction.
Conjugation[edit]
Quotations[edit]
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

sit (plural sits)

  1. (mining) Subsidence of the roof of a coal mine.
  2. (rare, Buddhism) An event, usually lasting one full day or more, where the primary goal is to sit in meditation.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sit (plural sits)

  1. (informal) Short for situation.
    • 2012, Gail Shisler, For Country and Corps: The Life of General Oliver P. Smith:
      The increasing scope of the disaster was relayed in short, terse sentences whose brevity does not conceal the unfolding nightmare. [] In mid-afternoon at 1600: “Sit is getting worse; need help badly,” “have considerable number of wounded that are unable to evacuate.”
Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Formally from Dutch zitten (to sit), from Frankish *sittjan, from Proto-Germanic *sitjaną. Semantically from a merger of the former and related Dutch zetten (to set, put), from Proto-Germanic *satjaną, whence also Afrikaans set (chiefly in compounds). Both Germanic verbs are eventually from Proto-Indo-European *sed-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sit (present sit, present participle sittende, past participle gesit)

  1. (intransitive) to sit; to be in a sitting position (usually used with op, binne or in)
    Sy sit en sein vir haar dogtertjie.
    She is sitting and gesturing to her young daughter.
  2. (intransitive) to sit; to sit down to move into a sitting position
    Sit asseblief.
    Please sit down.
  3. (transitive) to place, to put
    Ek sit jou sleutels op die tafel.
    I am putting your keys on the table.
  4. (transitive) to deposit
    Ek gaan al my geld in die bank sit.
    I am going to deposit all my money in the bank.

Usage notes[edit]

  • Sit and its derivatives are usually more commonly used than plaas for their overlapping senses, but are sometimes considered less formal than plaas, especially in formal writing.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sit n (common sin, plural sine)

  1. (reflexive possessive) third-person sg pronoun, meaning his/her/its (own)

See also[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sit

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐌹𐍄

Karelian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Veps sid'.

Adverb[edit]

sit

  1. here

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sit

  1. third-person singular present active subjunctive of sum (be)
    • 4th century, St Jerome, Vulgate, Tobit 3:23
      Sit nomen tuum Deus Israhel benedictum in saecula. (Be thy name, O God of Israel, blessed for ever.)

References[edit]


Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

sit

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of sist
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of sist
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of sist
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of sist
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of sist
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of sist

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Verb[edit]

sit

  1. present tense of sitja, sitje, sitta and sitte
  2. imperative of sitja and sitje

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sitъ.

Noun[edit]

sit m inan

  1. Any rush of the genus Juncus.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

sit n

  1. genitive plural of sito

Further reading[edit]

  • sit in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sytъ (satiated, full).

Adjective[edit]

sȉt (definite sȉtī, comparative sitiji, Cyrillic spelling си̏т)

  1. sated, full
Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sitъ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȋt m (Cyrillic spelling си̑т)

  1. rush (genus Juncus)

Declension[edit]

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Slovene[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sytъ.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sȉt (comparative bȍlj sȉt, superlative nȁjbolj sȉt)

  1. sated, full

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sitъ.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sȋt m inan

  1. rush (genus Juncus)

Further reading[edit]

  • sit”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Southern Ohlone[edit]

Noun[edit]

sit

  1. tooth

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English shit.

Noun[edit]

sit

  1. remnant

Veps[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to Finnish sitta.

Noun[edit]

sit

  1. shit