her

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See also: hér, hèr, hær, and her-

English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English here, hire, from Old English hiere(her), from Proto-Germanic *hezōi(dative and genitive singular of *hijō). Cognate with North Frisian hör, Saterland Frisian hier, hiere(her), West Frisian har(her), Dutch haar(her), German Low German hör(her), German ihr(her).

Determiner[edit]

her

  1. Belonging to her.
    This is her book

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

her

  1. The form of she used after a preposition or as the object of a verb; that woman, that ship, etc.
    Give it to her (after preposition)
    He wrote her a letter (indirect object)
    He treated her for a cold (direct object)
    • February 1896, Ground-swells, by Jeannette H. Walworth, published in Lippincott's Monthly Magazine; page 183:
      "Then what became of her?"
      "Her? Which ‘her’? The park is full of ‘hers’."
      "The lady with the green feathers in her hat. A big Gainsborough hat. I am quite sure it was Miss Hartuff."

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

her ‎(plural hers)

  1. (informal) A female person or animal.
    I think this bird is a him, but it may be a her.
    • Hélène Cixous
      [] daring dizzying passages in other, fleeting and passionate dwellings within the hims and hers whom she inhabits []
    • 2004, Charles J. Sullivan, Love and Survival (page 68)
      By this time, she had so many questions, but she only hit him up for one answer about those “hims” and “hers.” She asked, “Do both hims and hers reproduce hummers?”

Synonyms[edit]

Statistics[edit]

Most common English words before 1923: at · by · on · #23: her · which · have · or

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin ferrum. Compare Daco-Romanian fier, Spanish hierro.

Noun[edit]

her n (plural heari/heare)

  1. iron

Related terms[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Noun[edit]

her

  1. Mixed mutation of ger.

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. here

Related terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. here

Usage notes[edit]

  • Not in common usage, "hier" is rather used. "her" is only used in expressions like the ones below.

Derived terms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. here

German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Old High German hera.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. hither, to this place, to here, to me/us
  2. ago

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • her in Duden online

Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

hēr

  1. Romanization of 𐌷𐌴𐍂

Icelandic[edit]

Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse herr.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

her m ‎(genitive singular hers, nominative plural herir)

  1. army, military

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Kurdish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Persian.

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. every, each
  2. anyone
  3. anyway

Limburgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From hieër

Noun[edit]

her m

  1. vocative of hieër
  2. mister!
  3. Lord!

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse hér.

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. here

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hér.

Adverb[edit]

her

  1. here
    Det er fint å vera her.
    It's nice to be here.

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

her m ‎(definite singular heren, indefinite plural herar, definite plural herane)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by hær

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, apparently from the stem *hi- ‘this’; the exact formation is unclear. Cognate with Old Saxon hēr, Old High German hiar, Old Norse hér, Gothic 𐌷𐌴𐍂(her).

Adverb[edit]

hēr

  1. here
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hērą, from Proto-Indo-European *keres-(rough hair, bristle). Cognate with Old Saxon hār, Dutch haar, Old High German hār (German Haar), Old Norse hár (Swedish hår).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

hēr n

  1. hair
Descendants[edit]

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *hairaz, whence also Old English hār, Old Norse hárr.

Adjective[edit]

hēr

  1. old

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Persian هر(har). Cognate with Latin salvus(safe, whole), Ancient Greek ὅλος(hólos, complete, whole).

Adjective[edit]

her

  1. every
  2. each

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

her ‎(plural hers)

  1. hair

Declension[edit]


Welsh[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

her f (plural heriau)

  1. challenge

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
her unchanged unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Zazaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

her ?

  1. donkey