hem

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See also: Hem, hẻm, 'hem, and hem-

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

A sound uttered in imitation of clearing the throat (onomatopoeia)

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hem

  1. Used to fill in the gap of a pause with a vocalized sound.

Noun[edit]

hem (plural hems)

  1. An utterance or sound of the voice like "hem", often indicative of hesitation or doubt, sometimes used to call attention.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Spectator
      his morning hems

Verb[edit]

hem (third-person singular simple present hems, present participle hemming, simple past and past participle hemmed)

  1. To make the sound expressed by the word hem; to hesitate in speaking.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English hem, hemm, in turn from Old English hemm and related to Middle High German hemmen (to hem in), Old Norse hemja (to hem in, restrain). The Proto-Indo-European root gave rise also to Armenian քամել (kʿamel, to press, wring) and Russian ком (kom, lump).

The verb is from Middle English hemmen, from Old English *hemman, from Proto-Germanic *hamjaną, or alternatively derived from the noun.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

A stitched hem.
Drawing of a sheet metal hem.

hem (plural hems)

  1. (sewing) The border of an article of clothing doubled back and stitched together to finish the edge and prevent it from fraying.
  2. A rim or margin of something.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      hem of the sea
  3. In sheet metal design, a rim or edge folded back on itself to create a smooth edge and to increase strength or rigidity.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

hem (third-person singular simple present hems, present participle hemming, simple past and past participle hemmed)

  1. (intransitive) (in sewing) To make a hem.
  2. (transitive): To put hem on an article of clothing, to edge or put a border on something.
  3. (transitive): To surround something or someone in a confining way.
Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English hem, from Old English heom (them, dative), originally a dative plural form but in Middle English coming to serve as an accusative plural as well. More at 'em.

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. Obsolete form of 'em.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Caxton
      And wente to the kinge and to the queene, and said to hem with a glad cheer.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Caxton
      For eyther of hem mayntened.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Nisbet, M
      He prayis hem to lyue releg[ious] lyff[is] and to luk waraly for the cummyng of the lord.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Florio
      ‘What thinke you of this English, tel me I pray you.’ ‘It is a language that wyl do you good in England but passe Dover, it is woorth nothing.’ ‘Is it not used then in other countreyes?’ ‘No sir, with whom wyl you that they speake?’ ‘With English marchants.’ ‘English marchantes, when they are out of England, it liketh hem not, and they doo not speake it.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser
      Tho to the greene wood they speeden hem all.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Ben Jonson
      Except we make hem such.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Marston
      They go forth on Holydays and gather hem by the seashore.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Andrew Marvell
      The mayor and alderman or any six of hem.

Anagrams[edit]


Bislama[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English him.

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. Third person singular pronoun:
    1. he; she
    2. him; her
    3. his; her
    4. his; hers

Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

hem

  1. first-person plural present indicative form of haver

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch hem, from Old Dutch himo, from Proto-Germanic *himmai.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. (personal) Third-person singular, masculine, objective: him.
    Stuur dat maar naar hem.
    Send that to him.
  2. (personal) The tagger in a game of tag: it.

Inflection[edit]



Icelandic[edit]

Verb[edit]

hem (weak)

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hemja
  2. second-person singular imperative of hemja

Kurdish[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

hem

  1. and

See also[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hem

  1. eh?, well well! (expressing surprise)

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • hem in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hem in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Dutch himo, from Proto-Germanic *himmai.

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. inflection of hi:
    1. accusative
    2. dative
  2. dative of het

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Dutch hin, from Proto-Germanic *himaz.

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. inflection of si (they):
    1. accusative
    2. dative

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English heom, from Proto-Germanic *himaz, masculine and neuter dative plural of *hiz.

Pronoun[edit]

hem (nominative he)

  1. Third-person plural accusative pronoun: them.
    • 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 9–11.
      And smale foweles maken melodye,
      That slepen al the nyght with open eye-
      (So priketh hem Nature in hir corages);
      And many little birds make melody
      That sleep through all the night with open eye
      (So Nature pricks them on to ramp and rage)
    • 1407, The Testimony of William Thorpe, pages 40–41
      And with alle these men I was ofte homli and I comownede with hem long tyme and fele, and so bifore alle othir men I chees wilfulli to be enformed bi hem and of hem, and speciali of Wiclef himsilf, as of the moost vertuous and goodlich wise man that I herde of owhere either knew.
  2. (reflexive) themselves.
Descendants[edit]
See also[edit]

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. Alternative form of him

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

hem

  1. imperative of hemme

Pijin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English him

Pronoun[edit]

hem

  1. he/she/it (third-person singular pronoun)
    • 1988, Geoffrey Miles White, Bikfala faet: olketa Solomon Aelanda rimembarem Wol Wo Tu[1], page 75:
      Bihaen hemi finisim skul blong hem, hemi go minista long sios long ples blong hem long 'Areo.

See also[edit]

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Portuguese[edit]

Interjection[edit]

hem

  1. Rare form of hein.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse heim < heimr, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hem

  1. home; to one's home
    Det är dags att gå hem.
    It is time to go home.

Noun[edit]

hem n

  1. a home; one's dwelling place, as in a house or a more general geographical place; the abiding place of the affections.
  2. a home; an institution

Declension[edit]

Declension of hem 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hem hemmet hem hemmen
Genitive hems hemmets hems hemmens

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Persian هم(ham).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

hem

  1. and also

Conjunction[edit]

hem

  1. both; and
    Hem bu hem şuBoth this one and that one