rim

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Rim, rím, Rím, and Řím

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rim, rym, rime, from Old English rima (rim, edge, border, bank, coast), from Proto-Germanic *rimô, *rembô (edge, border), from Proto-Indo-European *rem-, *remə- (to rest, support, be based). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Rim (plank, wooden cross, trellis), Old Saxon rimi (edge; border; trim), Icelandic rimi (a strip of land).

Noun[edit]

rim (plural rims)

  1. An edge around something, especially when circular.
  2. (automotive, cycling) A wheelrim.
  3. (journalism) A semicircular copydesk.
    • 2004, John Russial, Strategic Copy Editing (page 130)
      A copy chief with poor people skills makes life miserable for copy editors on the rim; []
    • 2009, Gaylon Eugene Murray, Effective Editing (page 7)
      On the rim are copy editors who edit stories for accuracy, brevity and clarity.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

rim (third-person singular simple present rims, present participle rimming, simple past and past participle rimmed) (transitive)

  1. To form a rim on.
  2. (transitive) To follow the contours, possibly creating a circuit.
    Palm trees rim the beach.
    A walking path rims the island.
  3. (transitive or intransitive, of a ball) To roll around a rim.
    The golf ball rimmed the cup.
    The basketball rimmed in and out.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rim, rym, ryme, reme, from Old English rēoma (membrane, ligament), from Proto-Germanic *reumô (belt, thong), from Proto-Indo-European *rew- (to tear, dig, gather). Cognate with Dutch riem (a thong), German Riemen (a thong, band), Swedish rem (a thong, strap).

Noun[edit]

rim (plural rims)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A membrane.
  2. (Britain dialectal or obsolete) The membrane enclosing the intestines; the peritoneum, hence loosely, the intestines; the lower part of the abdomen; belly.
    • 1599, Shakespeare, “Act IV, scene IV - Pistol to a captured French soldier from whom he wants a ransom and whom he does not understand”, in King Henry V:
      Moy shall not serve; I will have forty moys; / Or I will fetch thy rim out at thy throat / In drops of crimson blood.

Etymology 3[edit]

From a variation of ream.

Verb[edit]

rim (third-person singular simple present rims, present participle rimming, simple past and past participle rimmed)

  1. (slang) To lick the anus of a partner as a sexual act.
    • 2008, Lexy Harper, Bedtime Erotica for Freaks (Like Me), page 216
      When she started thrusting her hips back against his finger, he turned her over and rimmed her asshole as he fingered her clit.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrím, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmą.

Noun[edit]

rim c (singular definite rimen, not used in plural form)

  1. hoarfrost, rime

Etymology 2[edit]

From late Old Norse rím, from Middle Low German rim, from French rime (rhyme).

Noun[edit]

rim n (singular definite rimet, plural indefinite rim)

  1. rhyme
Inflection[edit]
Further reading[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See rime.

Verb[edit]

rim

  1. imperative of rime

Indonesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪm]
  • Hyphenation: rim

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch riem, from Middle Dutch rieme, from Old French raime, rayme (ream), from Arabic رِزْمَة(rizma, bundle).

Noun[edit]

rim (plural, first-person possessive rimku, second-person possessive rimmu, third-person possessive rimnya)

  1. ream, a bundle, package, or quantity of paper, nowadays usually containing 500 sheets.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch riem, from Middle Dutch rieme, from Old Dutch *riomo, from Proto-Germanic *reumô.

Noun[edit]

rim (plural, first-person possessive rimku, second-person possessive rimmu, third-person possessive rimnya)

  1. (colloquial) leather belt.

Further reading[edit]


Mizo[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rim

  1. smell
  2. odour

Adverb[edit]

rim

  1. hard

Northern Kurdish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic رُمْح(rumḥ).[1] For rimb, compare the probably related Old Armenian ռումբ (ṙumb).

Noun[edit]

r̄im

  1. spear, lance, javelin
  2. unit of measure the length of a spear

Descendants[edit]

  • Armenian: ռըմ (ṙəm) (Van, Moks, Shatakh)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chyet, Michael L. (2003) , “rim”, in Kurdish–English Dictionary, with selected etymologies by Martin Schwartz, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, page 518a

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse rím and (Old?) French rime

Noun[edit]

rim n (definite singular rimet, indefinite plural rim, definite plural rima or rimene)

  1. a rhyme
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hrím

Noun[edit]

rim m (definite singular rimen, uncountable)
rim n (definite singular rimet, uncountable)

  1. rime (frost)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse rím, from Old French rime.

Noun[edit]

rim n (definite singular rimet, indefinite plural rim, definite plural rima)

  1. a rhyme
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse hrím. Akin to English rime.

Noun[edit]

rim n (definite singular rimet, uncountable)

  1. rime (frost)
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *rīmą (number, count, series), from Proto-Indo-European *re(i)- (to reason, count). Akin to Old Frisian rīm, Old Saxon -rīm, Old High German rīm, Icelandic rím.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

rīm n (nominative plural rīm)

  1. a number, counting, reckoning, numeral; calendar
    Rim miclade monna mægþe geond middan-geard(please add an English translation of this quote) (Cædmon’s Metrical Paraphrase)
    rīmġetæl, rīmtalunumber, figure
    rīmcræftarithmetic
    rīmerecounter, computer, calculator
  2. sum; enumeration
  3. (in compounds) multitude, group
    rīmāþan oath taken by a group, group-oath

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology[edit]

Via Old Portuguese rin, from Latin rēn, from Proto-Italic *hrēn, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰren- (an internal part of the body).

Pronunciation[edit]

rins

Noun[edit]

rim m (plural rins)

  1. kidney
  2. (in the plural) small of the back

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse rím, from Proto-Germanic *rīmą.

Noun[edit]

rim n

  1. rhyme

Declension[edit]

Declension of rim 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative rim rimmet rim rimmen
Genitive rims rimmets rims rimmens

See also[edit]


Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

rim (nominative plural rims)

  1. rhyme

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Westrobothnian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ríːm] (example of pronunciation)
    Rhymes: -íːm

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse hrím, from Proto-Germanic *hrīmą.

Noun[edit]

rim n

  1. frost, hoarfrost

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse rím, from Proto-Germanic *rīmą.

Noun[edit]

rim n

  1. story, poem, saga
  2. rumour

Related terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Zhuang[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tai *k.temᴬ (full). Cognate with Thai เต็ม (dtem), Lao ເຕັມ (tem), Northern Thai ᨲᩮ᩠ᨾ, ᦎᦲᧄ (ṫiim), Shan တဵမ် (těm), Nong Zhuang daem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rim (old orthography rim)

  1. full