oir

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See also: OIr, oír, óir, óír, òir, öir, oïr, -oir, and -óir

Catalan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (archaic, dialectal) oure

Etymology[edit]

From Latin audīre, present active infinitive of audiō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew-is-d-, a compound of Proto-Indo-European *h₂ewis (clearly, manifestly) (from the root *h₂ew- (to see, perceive)) and *dʰh₁-ye/o- (to render).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

oir (first-person singular present oeixo, past participle oït)

  1. to hear

Conjugation[edit]

Archaic forms:[1]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “oir” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Irish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish oirid (is suited or adapted (to), corresponds (to), is in keeping (with)).

Verb[edit]

oir (present analytic oireann, future analytic oirfidh, verbal noun oiriúint, past participle oirthe)

  1. (intransitive) suit, fit, become

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

  • oir do (wish, need, require)

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
oir n-oir hoir not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • Entries containing “oir” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “oir” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • audir (10th century, attested in the third-person singular and the past participle audit)
  • oïr (diaereses are not universally used in scholarly transcriptions of Old French)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin audīre, present active infinitive of audiō.

Verb[edit]

oir

  1. to listen (to)
  2. to hear

Conjugation[edit]

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle French: ouyr, ouïr
  • Norman: ouir, ouï

Old Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

oir

  1. Alternative form of oyr

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Irish óre, hóre, from Latin hōra

Conjunction[edit]

oir

  1. since, for, because
    Thog iad teine, oir bha an latha fuar.They made a fire since the day was cold.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Irish ar.

Noun[edit]

oir f (genitive singular oire, plural oirean)

  1. edge, verge, fringe, margin, border, brink
    oir na creigethe edge of the cliff
    oir dhìreachstraight edge
    oir phàipeirmargin of a paper
    às oir a shùlafrom the corner of his eye
  2. rim, brim, lip
  3. ledge
    air oir na h-uinneigon the window sill
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • oir” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “óre, (hóre)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language