border

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See also: Border and börder

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Middle English bordure, from Old French bordeure, of Germanic origin, from Frankish *bord, equivalent to modern French bord (a border) + -er.

Akin to Middle High German borte (border, trim), German Borte (ribbon, trimming). Doublet of bordure. More at board.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

border (countable and uncountable, plural borders)

  1. The line or frontier area separating political or geographical regions.
    The border between Canada and USA is the longest in the world.
    • 1950 January, “Crossing the Border”, in Railway Magazine, page 2:
      The identification of the border between England and Scotland always has been a source of interest to railway travellers. For many years, however, the exact points north of Berwick and Carlisle at which the Anglo-Scottish main lines passed from one country to the other were not defined, but the erection of clear and unmistakable lineside signs has put the matter beyond all doubt.
    • 2013, Nicholas Watt and Nick Hopkins, Afghanistan bomb: UK to 'look carefully' at use of vehicles(in The Guardian, 1 May 2013)
      The Ministry of Defence said on Wednesday the men had been killed on Tuesday in the Nahr-e Saraj district of Helmand province, on the border of Kandahar just north of the provincial capital Lashkar Gah.
    • 23 June 2018, Mattha Busb, The Independent, Jogger crosses US-Canada border by mistake, is held for two weeks in detention centre
      A French tourist who accidentally crossed the border into the US from Canada during an evening jog was sent to a detention centre 125 miles away and held for two weeks until she was released.
  2. The outer edge of something.
    the borders of the garden
    • 1843, Jeremy Bentham, Principles of Morals and Legislation, Fragment on Government, Civil Code, Penal Law:
      upon the borders of these solitudes
    • a. 1678 (date written), Isaac Barrow, “(please specify the chapter name or sermon number). The Danger and Mischief of Delaying Reptentance”, in The Works of Dr. Isaac Barrow. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to VII), London: A[braham] J[ohn] Valpy, [], published 1830–1831, →OCLC:
      in the borders of death
  3. A decorative strip around the edge of something.
    There's a nice frilly border around the picture frame.
    a solid border around a table of figures
  4. A strip of ground in which ornamental plants are grown.
  5. (Britain, uncountable) border morris or border dancing; a vigorous style of traditional English dance originating from villages along the border between England and Wales, performed by a team of dancers usually with their faces disguised with black makeup.
  6. (computing) A string that is both a prefix and a suffix of another particular string.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

border (third-person singular simple present borders, present participle bordering, simple past and past participle bordered)

  1. (transitive) To put a border on something.
  2. (transitive) To form a border around; to bound.
  3. (transitive) To lie on, or adjacent to, a border of.
    Denmark borders Germany to the south.
  4. (intransitive) To touch at a border (with on, upon, or with).
    Connecticut borders on Massachusetts.
  5. (intransitive) To approach; to come near to; to verge (with on or upon).
    • 1671, John Tillotson, “Sermon II. The Folly of Scoffing at Religion. 2 Pet[er] III. 3.”, in The Works of the Most Reverend Dr. John Tillotson, Late Lord Archbishop of Canterbury: [], 8th edition, London: [] T. Goodwin, B[enjamin] Tooke, and J. Pemberton, []; J. Round [], and J[acob] Tonson] [], published 1720, →OCLC:
      Wit which borders upon profaneness [] deserves to be branded as folly.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Anagrams[edit]

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From bord +‎ -er, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

border

  1. to border (add a border to)
  2. to border (share a border with)
  3. to tuck in

Conjugation[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

border

  1. Alternative form of bourdour

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

border n

  1. indefinite plural of bord

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

border m

  1. indefinite plural of bord