no

From Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Translingual[edit]

Symbol[edit]

no

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Norwegian.

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English no, noo, na, a reduced form of none, noon, nan (none, not any) used before consonants (compare a to an), from Old English nān (none, not any), from Proto-West Germanic *nain, from Proto-Germanic *nainaz (not any, literally not one), equivalent to ne (not) +‎ a.

Cognate with Scots nae (no, not any, none), Old Frisian nān, nēn ("no, not any, none"), Saterland Frisian naan, neen (no, not any, none), North Frisian nian (no, not any, none), Old Dutch nēn ("no, not any, none"; > Dutch neen (no)), Old Norse neinn (no, not any, none). Compare also Old Saxon nigēn ("not any"; > Low German nen), Old Dutch nehēn (Middle Dutch negheen/negeen, Dutch geen), West Frisian gjin, Old High German nihein (> German kein). More at no, one.

Determiner[edit]

no

  1. Not any.
    Antonyms: any, some
    There is no water left.
    No hot dogs were sold yesterday.
    No geese were at the lake.
    No two people are the same.
    There was no score at the end of the first period. (The score was 0-0.)
  2. Hardly any.
    Antonyms: quite, some
    We'll be finished in no time at all.
    Fifty pounds for this is no money, really.
  3. Not any possibility or allowance of (doing something).
    No smoking
    There's no stopping her once she gets going.
  4. Not (a); not properly, not really; not fully.
    My mother's no fool.
    Working nine to five every day is no life.
    No geese have blue beaks.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English no, na, from Old English , (no, not, not ever, never), from Proto-Germanic *nai (never), *ne (not), from Proto-Indo-European *ne, *nē, *nēy (negative particle), equivalent to Old English ne (not) + ā, ever, always. Cognate with Scots na (no), Saterland Frisian noa (no), West Frisian (no), nea (never), Dutch nee (no), Low German nee (no), German nie (never), dialectal German (no), Danish nej (no), Swedish nej (no), Icelandic nei (no). More at nay.

Adverb[edit]

no (not comparable)

  1. (with following adjective) not, not at all
    1. Used before different, before comparatives with more and less, and idiomatically before other comparatives.
      It is a less physical kind of torture, but no less gruesome.
      You’re no better than a common thief.
      Look no further than one's nose
      This is no different from what we've been doing all along.
    2. (informal) Used idiomatically before certain other adjectives.
      This thing is no good.
      The teacher’s decision was no fair.
  2. (without adjective, now Scotland, informal) not
    I just want to find out whether she's coming or no.
    • 1725, Daniel Defoe, An essay on the history and reality of apparitions:
      AS the Devil is not so Black as he is Painted, so neither does he appear in so many Shapes as we make for him; we Dress him up in more Suits of Cloaths, and more Masquerade Habits, than ever he wore; and I question much, if he was to see the Pictures and Figures which we call Devil, whether he would know himself by some of them or no.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. Used to show disagreement, negation, denial, refusal, or prohibition.
    Synonyms: nay, nope
    Antonyms: yes, yea, aye, maybe
    No, you are mistaken.
    No, you may not watch television now.
    David, no!
  2. Used to show agreement with a negative question.
    Synonyms: nah, nay, nope
    "Don’t you like milk?" "No" (i.e., "No, I don’t like milk.")
  3. (colloquial) Used together with an affirmative word or phrase to show agreement.
    No, totally.
    No, yeah, that's exactly right.
    "Wow!" "Yeah, no, it was really awful!"
Descendants[edit]
  • American Sign Language: H^o@Side-PalmForward Flatten

Preposition[edit]

no

  1. without
  2. like
  3. (colloquial, usually humorous) not, does not, do not, etc.
Synonyms[edit]
Coordinate terms[edit]
  • (Expression of negation): way
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

no (plural noes or nos)

  1. a negating expression; an answer that shows disagreement, denial, refusal, or disapproval
    • 1994, Brannon Braga, Ronald D. Moore, “All Good Things...”, in Star Trek: The Next Generation, season 7, episodes 25-26, John de Lancie (actor):
      Q: I'll answer any ten questions that call for a yes or a no.
  2. a vote not in favor, or opposing a proposition
    The workers voted on whether to strike, and there were thirty "yeses" and two "nos".
Synonyms[edit]
Antonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Variant of No., from the scribal abbreviation for Latin numero (in number, to the number of).

Adverb[edit]

no (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of No.

Noun[edit]

no (plural nos)

  1. Alternative form of No.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • no”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Anagrams[edit]

Ainu[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Particle[edit]

no (Kana spelling )

  1. Adverbialising particle; -ly, ing
    asirinew
    asiri nonewly
    pirikagood
    pirika nowell
    nukarato see
    nukara no anseeing (literally, “being seeing”)
    opittaall
    opitta no okayall (literally, “being all”)

Etymology 2[edit]

Particle[edit]

no (Kana spelling )

  1. Alternative form of ro

Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Related to German noch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. still, yet
    Bisch no do?Are you still here?
  2. eventually (at an unknown time in the future)
    Er chunt scho no.He will come eventually.
  3. (only) just; barely (by a small margin)
    Sii hät grad no so gwunne.She just barely won.
  4. (with comparative) even
    Das isch sogar no schönner.This is even prettier.

Usage notes[edit]

  • (eventually): Often used together with an antecedent scho.
  • (just; barely): In this sense always used together with an antecedent grad.
  • (even): It can be used together with an antecedent sogar for amplification.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + neuter singular article lo (the).

Contraction[edit]

no n (masculine nel, feminine na, masculine plural nos, feminine plural nes)

  1. in the

Atong (India)[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Verb[edit]

no- (Bengali script নো)

  1. to say

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hindi नौ (nau).

Numeral[edit]

no (Bengali script নো)

  1. nine
Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

Awa (New Guinea)[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN

Bavarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old High German noh, from Proto-West Germanic *noh, from Proto-Germanic *nuh, from Proto-Indo-European *nū-kʷe-. Cognates include German noch, Yiddishנאָך(nokh) and Dutch nog, Dutch noch.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. still, yet (up to and including a given time)
    Mia san no ned då.We're not there yet.
    Des geht si no aus.There's still time for that.
  2. yet, eventually (at an unknown time in the future)
    Mia wern scho no åkumma.We'll arrive eventually.
  3. additionally, in addition, besides, else; more often expressed in English with another, more
    No ana!Another one!
    Foid da no wås ei?Can you think of anything else?
  4. (only) just; barely (by a small margin)
    Is se gråd no ausgånga.We made it just in time.
  5. (with comparative) even
    Des is jå no depperter.That's even more stupid.

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan no, from Latin nōn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. no (negation; commonly used to respond negatively to a question)

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not, main negation marker
    Antonyms: , hoc
    No tinc diners. No, I do not have money.
    No facis això. No, don't do that.

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m (plural nos)

  1. no

Further reading[edit]

Cebuano[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish no.

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. indicating surprise at, or requesting confirmation of, some new information; to express skepticism
  2. indicating that what was just said was obvious and unnecessary; contrived incredulity

Czech[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Short for ano (yes).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well, why
    No ne!Well, I never!

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. certainly, indeed, of course
  2. yeah, yep

Further reading[edit]

  • no in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • no in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dimasa[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. home

Dumbea[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. mosquito

References[edit]

Esperanto[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no (accusative singular no-on, plural no-oj, accusative plural no-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N.

See also[edit]

Ewe[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. breast

Verb[edit]

no

  1. to drink
  2. to suck

Fala[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese non, from Latin nōn (not); probably influenced by Spanish no.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. Alternative form of non (no, not)

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese no, equivalent to en (in) +‎ o (masculine singular definite article).

Alternative forms[edit]

  • nu (Lagarteiru, Valverdeñu)

Contraction[edit]

no m sg (plural nos, feminine na, feminine plural nas)

  1. (Mañegu) in the

References[edit]

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[2], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Similar interjections can be found in other Finnic languages (compare Estonian no, noh, Ingrian no, Karelian no, Livonian no, noh, Ludian no, Votic no) and possibly also in other Uralic languages (compare Komi-Zyrian но (no), Udmurt но (no)). Compare also to those found in neighboring Indo-European languages (such as Swedish , Latvian nu, Russian ну (nu)), which may all trace back as far as Proto-Indo-European *nu. SSA concludes that the interjection is probably part original and part foreign.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈno/, [ˈno̞]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Syllabification(key): no

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well! (to acknowledge a situation; encouragement to answer or react; expressing the overcoming of reluctance to say something; exclamation of indignance)
    Alternative form: noh
    No sepä mukavaa!Well, that’s nice.
    No kai meidän sitten pitää käydä katsomassa.Well I guess we have to go look then.
    No, mikset mennyt juhliin?Well, why didn't you go to the party?
    Siellä oli, no, aika tylsää.It was, well, pretty boring there.
    No, et sinä nyt noin voi käyttäytyä!Well! You can't behave like that!

References[edit]

  1. ^ Itkonen, Erkki; Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000) Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words]‎[1] (in Finnish), [note: linked online version also includes some other etymological sources], Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, →ISBN

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m

  1. Abbreviation of numéro (number).

Anagrams[edit]

Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
    Antonym:

Fula[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. how?

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From contraction of preposition en (in) + masculine article o (the).

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

no m (feminine na, masculine plural nos, feminine plural nas)

  1. in the

Etymology 2[edit]

From a mutation of o.

Pronoun[edit]

no m (accusative)

  1. Alternative form of o (him)
Usage notes[edit]

The n- forms of accusative third-person pronouns are used when the preceding word ends in -u or a diphthong, and are suffixed to the preceding word.

Related terms[edit]

Garo[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. younger sister

Synonyms[edit]

Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese nós. Cognate with Kabuverdianu nu.

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. we

Hawaiian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

no

  1. for, belonging to, from

Usage notes[edit]

  • Used for possessions that are inherited, out of personal control, and for things that can be got into (houses, clothes, cars), while na is used for acquired possessions.

Hone[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. husband

Further reading[edit]

  • Anne Storch, Hone, in Coding Participant Marking: Construction Types in Twelve African Languages, edited by Gerrit Jan Dimmendaal

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English noFrench nonItalian noSpanish no. Paronym to ne.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. no
    Antonym: yes

Ingrian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Cognate with Finnish no and Estonian no. It is uncertain whether this word is natively Finnic or a borrowing from an Indo-European language (compare Russian ну (nu) and Swedish ).

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well
    • 1936, D. I. Efimov, Lukukirja: Inkeroisia alkușkouluja vart (ensimäine osa), Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 12:
      No nii, peen - vastajaa Valja.
      Well yes, small - Valja replies.

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Russian но (no).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. but
    • 1936, L. G. Terehova, V. G. Erdeli, translated by Mihailov and P. I. Maksimov, Geografia: oppikirja iƶoroin alkușkoulun kolmatta klaassaa vart (ensimäine osa), Leningrad: Riikin Ucebno-Pedagogiceskoi Izdateljstva, page 5:
      No määmmä tunniin, toisen, a laageria ei oo.
      But we walk for an hour, another, and the camp isn't there.
Synonyms[edit]
See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Ruben E. Nirvi (1971) Inkeroismurteiden Sanakirja, Helsinki: Suomalais-Ugrilainen Seura, page 343

Interlingua[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
    No, ille non travalia hodie.No, he is not working today.

Noun[edit]

no (plural nos)

  1. no
    Illa time audir un no.She is afraid of hearing no.

Italian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin nōn.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
    Antonym:
    dire di noto say no
  2. not
    Vieni o no?Are you coming or not?
    Perché no?Why not?
  3. (by ellipsis) Used to replace negated nouns or adjectives; non-, not
    Synonym: meno
    cattolici e noCatholics and non-Catholics
    prodotti nuovi e nonew and not new products
  4. Used at the end of a sentence as a sort of tag question or to emphasize a statement; isn't it so, right
    Synonyms: nevvero, neh
    Te l'ho già detto, no?I already told you, right?
Related terms[edit]
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Japanese (, literally [performing] skill, talent).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m (invariable)

  1. Noh (a type of Japanese drama)

Etymology 3[edit]

Borrowed from English no.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /no/°
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Hyphenation: no
  • Unlike the above words, this word is unstressed and never triggers syntactic gemination in the following word.

Determiner[edit]

no (invariable)

  1. no, anti-; found in numerous expressions borrowed from English, such as no comment, and in pseudo-anglicisms such as no logo (anti-globalization) and no-vax (anti-vax) (also written no vax)

Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

no

  1. Rōmaji transcription of
  2. Rōmaji transcription of

Kalasha[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit नव (nava).

Numeral[edit]

no

  1. nine; 9

Kikuyu[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

no

  1. (it is) only[1]
    Gĩkũrũ kĩega no kĩratina.[2] - The only good old thing is a sausage tree fruit (for fermenting muratina).
    Mũndũ ũtathiaga oigaga no nyina ũrugaga wega. - One who does not travel says only his/her mother's cooking is good.

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. but[3]
    Mĩano ndĩtukanagio no kanua. - The diviner's gourds do not get confused, but a mouth does.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “no” in Benson, T.G. (1964). Kikuyu-English dictionary. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  2. ^ Wanjohi, G. J. (2001). Under One Roof: Gĩkũyũ Proverbs Consolidated, p. 21. Paulines Publications Africa.
  3. ^ Barlow, A. Ruffell (1960). Studies in Kikuyu Grammar and Idiom, pp. 32, 235.
  4. ^ Barra, G. (1960). 1,000 Kikuyu proverbs: with translations and English equivalents, p. 51. London: Macmillan.

Ladin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin non.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
  2. no

Ladino[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no (Latin spelling, Hebrew spellingנו⁩)

  1. not

Interjection[edit]

no (Latin spelling, Hebrew spellingנו⁩)

  1. no

Lashi[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *s-nak (black, evil). Cognates include Burmese နက် (nak) and Tibetan སྣག (snag).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

no

  1. black

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. early

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[4], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Italic *snāō, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)neh₂- (to flow, to swim). Cognate with Ancient Greek νάω (náō).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

(present infinitive nāre, perfect active nāvī); first conjugation, no passive, no supine stem

  1. (intransitive) to swim
    Nat lupus inter oves.The wolf swims between the sheep.
    Nare contra aquamTo swim against the stream
    Piger ad nandumSlow at swimming
    Ars nandiThe art of swimming
    • 1st century BC, Lucretius, De rerum natura iii. 479.
      Cum vini vis penetravit,
      Consequitur gravitas membrorum, præpediuntur
      Crura vacillanti, tardescit lingua, madet mens,
      Nant oculi, clamor, sigultis, jurgia gliscunt. --
      When once the force of wine hath inly pierst,
      Limbes-heavinesse is next, legs faine would goe,
      But reeling cannot, tongue drawles, mindes disperst,
      Eyes swime, ciries, hickups, brables grow.
  2. (intransitive) to float
    Synonym: fluitō
    Carinae nant freto.Ships float in the sea.
  3. (poetic, intransitive) to sail, flow, fly, etc.
    Per medium classi barbara navit Athon.The barbarian youth sailed its fleet through the middle of Athos.
    Undae nantes refulgent.The flowing waves glitter.

Conjugation[edit]

   Conjugation of (first conjugation, no supine stem, active only)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present nās nat nāmus nātis nant
imperfect nābam nābās nābat nābāmus nābātis nābant
future nābō nābis nābit nābimus nābitis nābunt
perfect nāvī nāvistī nāvit nāvimus nāvistis nāvērunt,
nāvēre
pluperfect nāveram nāverās nāverat nāverāmus nāverātis nāverant
future perfect nāverō nāveris nāverit nāverimus nāveritis nāverint
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present nem nēs net nēmus nētis nent
imperfect nārem nārēs nāret nārēmus nārētis nārent
perfect nāverim nāverīs nāverit nāverīmus nāverītis nāverint
pluperfect nāvissem nāvissēs nāvisset nāvissēmus nāvissētis nāvissent
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present nāte
future nātō nātō nātōte nantō
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives nāre nāvisse
participles nāns
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
nandī nandō nandum nandō

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • no in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • no in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Latvian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Preposition[edit]

no

  1. from
    skaitīt no viens līdz desmitto count from one to ten
    viņš ir no Latvijashe is from Latvia
  2. out of
    iziet no istabasto go out of the room
  3. for
  4. of
    viens no viņa draugiemone of his friends
    izgatavots no kokamade of wood
  5. with
    no sirdswith all one's heart

Lombard[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. Alternative spelling of .

Louisiana Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium. Particularly: “Probably from French "nous" or a clipping of Louisiana Creole "nouzòt" and/or French "nous autres".”)

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. Alternative form of nouzòt (we, us)

Luxembourgish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German nāh, from Old High German nāh, from Proto-West Germanic *nāhw, from Proto-Germanic *nēhw.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

no (+ dative)

  1. after (in time)
  2. after (in a sequence)
  3. according to
  4. to, towards (a direction)

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

no (masculine noen, neuter not, comparative méi no, superlative am noosten or am nächsten)

  1. nearby, near, nigh
  2. close, closely related

Declension[edit]

Middle Dutch[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

  1. Alternative form of noch

Further reading[edit]

Middle English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English , (adj).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

no

  1. no
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English , .

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Mòcheno[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German nāch, from Old High German nāh. Cognate with Cimbrian and German nach; see there for more.

Preposition[edit]

no

  1. (+ dative) after

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

Mokilese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. wave

Narua[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *na-ŋ (you).

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. You (singular)

Declension[edit]

NOM no
ACC nom
DAT nokégébé
ABL nokélo
GEN noké
COM nolékobé

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. (obsolete) now (this very moment)

Usage notes[edit]

Part of the "Nazi reform" of 1941, made during Norwegian occupation by Germany. Almost exclusively used in texts made under occupation, and not generally considered a part of the official Bokmål chronology.

Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse núna, derived from .

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no n (definite singular noet, indefinite plural no, definite plural noa)

  1. moment; point in time

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. now

Derived terms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. used when finding something out; when being irritated
    • 1861, Aasmund Olavsson Vinje, Ferdaminni fraa Sumaren 1860:
      Der maa no vera nokot smaatt fint Gras imillom, som Femulen finner, for ellers kunde der ikki bu annat Liv enn Reinsdyret.
      There must be some small fine grass in between for the cattle to find, otherwise no other life than the reindeer could live there.
    • 1851, Ludvig Mathias Lindeman, Liti Kjersti og bergekongen (transcription of an oral song):
      Gakk no deg i Stova inn
      Go (you) inside the house
    • Det kan no faen ikkje stemme at traktor'n var så billeg
      It can't be damn right that the tractor was so cheap
    • Er det no sånn at dåkk vil ikkje bli med på fjellturen?
      Is it so, that ya'll don't want to join on the mountain trip?
    • Eg skulle no vore på elgjakta no, men i staden for det må eg vera her og rydde.
      I was supposed to be on the moose hunt now, but I must be here and clean up instead.
    • Kom igjen no då!
      C'mon!

References[edit]

Notsi[edit]

Particle[edit]

no

  1. plural marker

Further reading[edit]

  • Language Complexity: Typology, Contact, Change, edited by Matti Miestamo, Kaius Sinnemäki, Fred Karlsson

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

ne +‎ ā

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

  1. Alternative form of

Old Irish[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. Alternative spelling of

Old Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin non.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
    Antonym: oc

Descendants[edit]

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Sanskrit नः (naḥ, us).

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. accusative/instrumental/genitive/dative plural of ahaṃ (us)

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Sanskrit नो (no, and not).

Particle[edit]

no

  1. surely not
  2. indeed not
Usage notes[edit]

Sometimes reinforced by na (not)

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

Emphatic form of nu (then, now)

Particle[edit]

no

  1. indeed, then, now

References[edit]

Pali Text Society (1921–1925), “no”, in Pali-English Dictionary‎, London: Chipstead

Papiamentu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese não and Spanish no and Kabuverdianu nau.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
  2. not

Polish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of ano.[1] Compare Czech no, Masurian , Silesian no, Slovak no. First attested in the 19th century.[2]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. (colloquial) yeah, yep
    Synonyms: ano, tak

Particle[edit]

no

  1. used to state the speaker thinks something is obvious and that one should not ponder further; well, well yeah
  2. used to state that the speaker thinks everything that can be said has been said and would like to finish the topic
  3. (colloquial, hedge) expresses uncertainty; well
  4. (usually as a question) used to encourage the conversation partner to give a response; well?
  5. (often extended) used to express surprise, awe, or caution
  6. (colloquial) Filled pause, usually connecting a previous sentence; well
  7. introduces a question, often lightly emotionally charged
  8. used to draw attention to the current situation

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of ino, jeno, jedno.[3] First attested in 1749.[4] Compare Silesian no.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. emphatic particle used with imperatives to speed up a performed action; c'mon, now
    Synonym: ano
    • 1841, Józef Ignacy Kraszewski, Szkice obyczajowe i historyczne, page 171:
       [] wróciwszy z kluczem na posłanie. — Niech mnie licho porwie, jeśli cię puszczę — musisz zostać z nami. — O! figle! no! no! daj no klucza, rzekł śmiejąc się Alexy, daj no, serce, klucza! daj!
       [] having returned with the key. "Goddamn it, if I let you go, you'll have to stay with us." "Oh! Jokes! Cmon! Cmon! Cmon, give the key!" Alex said laughing. "Cmon, heart, give the key!"
Derived terms[edit]
particle

Trivia[edit]

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), no is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 3 times in scientific texts, 0 times in news, 7 times in essays, 106 times in fiction, and 484 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 600 times, making it the 76th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “no II”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)
  2. ^ J. Karłowicz, A. Kryński, W. Niedźwiedzki, editors (1904), “no”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), volume 3, Warsaw, page 398
  3. ^ Bańkowski, Andrzej (2000), “no I”, in Etymologiczny słownik języka polskiego [Etymological Dictionary of the Polish Language] (in Polish)
  4. ^ Aleksandra Wieczorek (07.12.2021), “NO”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century]
  5. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “no”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 293

Further reading[edit]

  • no in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • no in Polish dictionaries at PWN
  • Samuel Bogumił Linde (1807–1814), “no”, in Słownik języka polskiego
  • Aleksander Zdanowicz (1861), “no”, in Słownik języka polskiego, Wilno 1861
  • no in Narodowy Fotokorpus Języka Polskiego

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • Hyphenation: no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician-Portuguese no, clipping of eno, from en (in) + o (the).

Contraction[edit]

no (feminine na, masculine plural nos, feminine plural nas)

  1. Contraction of em o (in the, on the).
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lia Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 546:
      Está na hora de testarmos os nossos talentos no mundo real, você não acha?
      It's time to test our talents in the real world, don't you think?
Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

no

  1. Alternative form of o (third-person masculine singular objective pronoun) used as an enclitic following a verb form ending in a nasal vowel or diphthong
    Eles removeram-no do grupo devido a mau comportamento da sua parte. (Portugal)
    They removed him from the group due to bad behavior on his behalf.
    Costumava estar aqui um copo, mas eles partiram-no quando cá estiveram. (Portugal)
    There used to be a glass here, but they broke it when they were here.
Usage notes[edit]
  • This form is not found in Brazilian speech.
Quotations[edit]

For quotations using this term, see Citations:no.

Rohingya[edit]

Rohingya cardinal numbers
 <  8 9 10  > 
    Cardinal : no

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit नवन् (navan, nine).

Numeral[edit]

no (Hanifi spelling𐴕𐴡⁩)

  1. nine

Romanian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. (Transylvania) well, so

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish , , from Proto-Celtic *nowe (compare Welsh neu and Old Breton nou).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɔ/, /nə/
  • Hyphenation: no

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. or
  2. nor
  3. neither

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *nъ, (Russian но (no), ну (nu)), from Proto-Balto-Slavic *nu (Lithuanian nu), from Proto-Indo-European *nu (now), (Latin nun-c, Ancient Greek νῦν (nûn)).

Pronunciation[edit]

Conjunction[edit]

no (Cyrillic spelling но)

  1. (after a comparative, regional, dated, expressively) than (=nȅgo, ȍd)
    bolji no onbetter than him
    → (= modern)
    bolji nego on/bolji od njega
    better than him
    Izgledaš bolje no ikad.You' re looking better than ever.
    Proračunski manjak Grčke u bio je značajno veći no što je vlada proc(ij)enila.Greece's budget deficit was significantly bigger than the government had estimated.
  2. (denoting exclusion) but, however
    Pogrešno, no bio si dosta blizu.Wrong, but you were pretty close.
    No os(j)ećam samo sreću.But I can' t feel anything but happy.
    Tekst nije savršen, no nije li mogao biti bolji?The text is not perfect, but could it have been better?

Etymology 2[edit]

From Japanese ().

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

 m (Cyrillic spelling но̑)

  1. (theater) noh

Etymology 3[edit]

From the conjunction no.

Pronunciation[edit]

Particle[edit]

no (Cyrillic spelling но)

  1. (in a dialog, when responding to the interlocutor) damn right!, you bet! very much so!

References[edit]

  • no” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • no” in Hrvatski jezični portal
  • no” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Shabo[edit]

Verb[edit]

no

  1. go

Siane[edit]

Noun[edit]

no

  1. water

References[edit]

  • The Papuan Languages of New Guinea (1986, →ISBN

Silesian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɔ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Syllabification: no

Etymology 1[edit]

Clipping of ano. Compare Polish no.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. used to state the speaker thinks something is obvious and that one should not ponder further; well, well yeah
  2. (usually as a question) used to encourage the conversation partner to give a response; well?

Etymology 2[edit]

Clipping of ino. Compare Polish no.

Particle[edit]

no

  1. emphatic particle used with imperatives to speed up a performed action; c'mon, now

Further reading[edit]

  • no in silling.org

Spanish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish non, from Latin nōn (compare Catalan no, Galician non, French non, Italian no, Portuguese não, Romanian nu).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈno/ [ˈno]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Syllabification: no

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
  2. not
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Interjection[edit]

¿no?

  1. eh? (used as a tag question, to emphasise what goes before or to request that the listener express an opinion about what has been said)
Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m (plural noes)

  1. no

Etymology 2[edit]

Contracted form of Latin numero, ablative singular of numerus (number).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m (plural nos)

  1. Abbreviation of número.; no.
Alternative forms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English no.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. no
  2. not

Etymology 2[edit]

Particle[edit]

no

  1. Precedes intensifiers, untranslatable
    A nyan switi no todo.
    The food is delicious.
    A waran no hel.
    It's awfully hot.

Tagalog[edit]

Particle[edit]

no (Baybayin spelling ᜈᜓ)

  1. Alternative spelling of 'no

Tok Pisin[edit]

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

Etymology[edit]

From English no.

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Jenesis 2:5:
      ...i no gat diwai na gras samting i kamap long graun yet, long wanem, em i no salim ren i kam daun yet. Na i no gat man bilong wokim gaden.
      ...and no tree or kind of herb had appeared on the earth yet, because he had not sent rain to come down yet. And there was no one to work the garden.

Derived terms[edit]

Vietnamese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Vietic *ɗɔː (satiated). Cognate with Arem dɑː.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

no (, 𩛂)

  1. full (of the stomach)
    Antonym: đói
    Đang no.
    I'm full.
    No bụng rồi.
    My stomach's full.
  2. (archaic) full; complete
  3. (chemistry, of a solution) saturated
  4. (chemistry, of an organic compound) saturated

Usage notes[edit]

  • In modern usages, no only refers to the stomach being full, or by extension, a person having had enough to eat.

See also[edit]

Derived terms

Votic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Luutsa, Liivtšülä) IPA(key): /ˈno/, [ˈno]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Hyphenation: no

Etymology 1[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) Cognate with Finnish no and Ingrian no.

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. well

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Russian но (no).

Conjunction[edit]

no

  1. but (when serving to contrast)

References[edit]

  • Hallap, V.; Adler, E.; Grünberg, S.; Leppik, M. (2012) Vadja keele sõnaraamat [A dictionary of the Votic language]‎[5], 2nd edition, Tallinn

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French nom, from Latin nōmen (name), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁nómn̥.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

no m (plural nos)

  1. name

West Frisian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. now

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • no”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Interjection[edit]

no

  1. eh, isn't it, true (at end of declarative sentence, forms question to prompt listener's agreement)

Further reading[edit]

  • no”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Yola[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English no, from Old English .

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

no

  1. not
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY [1]:
      Aamezil cou no stoane.
      Themselves could not stand.
    • 1867, “A YOLA ZONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 14, page 90:
      Outh o'mee hoane ch'ull no part wi' Wathere.
      Out of my hand I'll not part with Walter.
    • 1867, “SONG”, in SONGS, ETC. IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, number 2, page 108:
      Hea had no much wut,
      He had not much wit,
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Determiner[edit]

no

  1. Alternative form of na
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, line 3 [2]:
      Vo no own caars.
      Whom no one cares.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 32
  2. ^ Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 129