nes

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Nes, NES, nés, -nes, and n'es

Afrikaans[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From net soos.

Adverb[edit]

nes

  1. like; just like
    Nes jy, is ek klaar met skool.
    Just like you, I am done with school.
  2. as soon as; just as something is about to do something
    Jy moet skiet nes hy omdraai.
    You must shoot as soon as he turns around.
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch nest, from Middle Dutch nest, from Old Dutch nest, from Proto-Germanic *nestaz, from Proto-Indo-European *nisdós.

Noun[edit]

nes (plural neste, diminutive nessie)

  1. nest, structure made out of twigs, mud, grass, etc.
  2. nest; a group of animals or insects that live together within a nest
  3. home or house, usually untidy or cluttered

Verb[edit]

nes (present nes, present participle nestende, past participle genes)

  1. to nest; to inhabit a nest

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A compound *ne +‎ *-s, from Proto-Indo-European *nō kwe. From Proto-Albanian *(e)nō ̊, from Proto-Indo-European *(h1)nē̆-, *(h1)nō̆- (after, behind, next to/after). Cognate to Welsh neithiwr (last night), Northern Lorung neizœr (id), Ancient Greek ἔνη(ς) (énē(s)), ἔνας (énas, the day after tomorrow) and Gothic 𐌽𐌴𐍈 (nēƕ, after).

Adverb[edit]

nes

  1. after, next after

Derived terms[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + feminine plural article les (the).

Contraction[edit]

nes f pl (masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, masculine plural nos)

  1. in the

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

nes

  1. inflection of nést:
    1. second-person singular imperative
    2. past masculine singular transgressive

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch nesse. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /nɛs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nes
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Noun[edit]

nes f (plural nessen, diminutive nesje n)

  1. headland, spit

Synonyms[edit]


Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nes (headland). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs,the German nase; the Latin nasus (a nose) as the Icelandic nös (nose).

Noun[edit]

nes n (genitive singular nes, plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory
  2. peninsula

Declension[edit]

n11s/n22p Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nes nesið nes nesini
Accusative nes nesið nes nesini
Dative nesi nesinum nes(j)um nes(j)unum
Genitive nes nesins nesja nesjanna

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Føroysk orðabók, 1998

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nes (headland). Cognate with Old English næs (> English ness and naze); Swedish näs, German Nase. Compare also Latin nasus (nose) and Icelandic nös (nostril).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes n (genitive singular ness, nominative plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]

  • oddi (spit of land, point)

References[edit]

  • Ensk Vasaorðabók, Orðabókaútgáfan 1985

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

nēs

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of

Lithuanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From an older nesà or nėsà, which Ford interprets as ne- + *so; the latter element being from Proto-Indo-European *so (conjunctve particle);[1] compare Hittite 𒋗 (šu-, preterite conjunctive particle), Old Irish se (conjunctive particle), ultimately deriving most likely from the Proto-Indo-European demonstrative *só, *séh₂, *tód. See tas for more. The further parallel drawn by Ford with Hittite 𒈾𒀸𒋗 (naššu, or) is neither supported nor ruled out by Kloekhorst.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /nʲɛs/

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Conjunction[edit]

nès

  1. (subordinating) because, since (expresses the reason for an action)
    Àš studijúoju, nès nóriu mókytis. - I study because I want to learn.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gordon B Ford, Jr. (1965), 'A Note on Lithuanian "nes"', Die Sprache, volume 11 (1–2), pages 136–137.
  2. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin, Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2008, →ISBN, page 689

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nes (headland).

Cognate with Faroese nes, Icelandic nes, Danish næs and possibly Norman nez.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes n (definite singular neset, indefinite plural nes, definite plural nesa or nesene)

  1. a headland (coastal land that juts into the sea)
    • 1872, Henrik Ibsen, Kongs-Emnerne, page 139:
      den tid der sad en konge på hvert næss
      that time there a king sat on every headland
    • 1888, Henrik Ibsen, Fruen fra havet, page 54:
      [fjorden] med øer og fremspringende næs
      [the fjord] with islands and protruding headlands
    • 1904, Hans E. Kinck, Emigranter, page 7:
      dernede om næsset … dreiede bølgerne sig
      down there around the headland… the waves turned
    • 1996, Ketil Bjørnstad, Historien om Edvard Munch, page 387:
      vi gikk bort til Munchs hus [i Kragerø], som ligger på et nes
      we went to Munch's house [in Kragerø], which is located on a headland
    • 2001, Bente Pedersen, Harpunsønnene:
      det store neset der fjorden var vid og verden nesten alltid virket blå
      the large headland where the fjord was wide and the world almost always seemed blue
    Synonyms: forberg, odde, tange

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • “nes” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “nes” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • nes” in Store norske leksikon

Anagrams[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes m (oblique plural nes, nominative singular nes, nominative plural nes)

  1. (anatomy) Alternative form of nés

Old Norse[edit]

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun[edit]

nes n

  1. headland

Descendants[edit]

  • Norwegian Bokmål: nes

References[edit]

  • nes in Geir T. Zoëga, A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1910

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French Nescafé, a trademark, itself a portmanteau of Nestlé and café.

Noun[edit]

nes n (plural nesuri)

  1. instant coffee

Declension[edit]



Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) nas

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun[edit]

nes m

  1. (anatomy, Puter) nose

Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English nurse.

Noun[edit]

nes

  1. nurse

Welsh[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *nésd-o-s, from *nesd- +‎ *-os. Cognate with Breton nes (near) and Proto-Indo-Iranian *názdyas (nearer).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nes

  1. comparative degree of agos: nearer
    Synonym: agosach

Conjunction[edit]

nes

  1. until
    Synonyms: oni, hyd oni
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

nes (not mutable)

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular preterite of gwneud

References[edit]

  1. ^ nes”, in R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors, Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, 1950–present
  2. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 51 vi.