nes

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See also: nés, Nes, NES, and -nes

Afrikaans[edit]

Adverb[edit]

nes

  1. like; just like
    Nes jy, is ek klaar met skool.
    Just like you, I am done with school.
  2. as soon as; just as something is about to do something
    Jy moet skiet nes hy omdraai.
    You must shoot as soon as he turns around.

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes ‎(plural neste, diminutive nessie)

  1. nest, structure made out of twigs, mud, grass, etc.
  2. nest; a group of animals or insects that live together within a nest
  3. home or house, usually untidy or cluttered

Verb[edit]

nes ‎(present nes, present participle nestende, past participle genes)

  1. to nest; to inhabit a nest

Albanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

A compound ne-s, from *nō kwe. From Proto-Albanian *(e)nō ̊, from Proto-Indo-European *(h1)nē̆-, *(h1)nō̆- ‎(after, behind, next to/after). Cognate to Welsh neithiwr ‎(last night), Breton neizœr ‎(id), Ancient Greek ἔνη(ς) ‎(énē(s)), ἔνας ‎(énas, the day after tomorrow) and Gothic nehʷ ‎(nehʷ, after).

Adverb[edit]

nes

  1. after, next after
Derived terms[edit]

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a contraction of the preposition en ‎(in) + feminine plural article les ‎(the).

Contraction[edit]

nes f pl ‎(masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, masculine plural nos)

  1. in the

Faroese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nes ‎(headland). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs,the German nase; the Latin nasus ‎(a nose) as the Icelandic nös ‎(nose).

Noun[edit]

nes n (genitive singular nes, plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory
  2. peninsula

Declension[edit]

n11s/n22p Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nes nesið nes nesini
Accusative nes nesið nes nesini
Dative nesi nesinum nes(j)um nes(j)unum
Genitive nes nesins nesja nesjanna

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Føroysk orðabók, 1998

Icelandic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse nes ‎(headland). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs,the German nase; the Latin nasus ‎(a nose) as the Icelandic nös ‎(the nostril).

Noun[edit]

nes n ‎(genitive singular ness, nominative plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Ensk Vasaorðabók, Orðabókaútgáfan 1985

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

nēs

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of

Lithuanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From an older nesà or nėsà, which Ford interprets as ne- + *so; the latter element being from Proto-Indo-European *so ‎(conjunctve particle);[1] compare Hittite 𒋗 ‎(šu-, preterite conjunctive particle), Old Irish se ‎(conjunctive particle), ultimately deriving most likely from the Proto-Indo-European demonstrative *só, *séh₂, *tód. See tas for more. The further parallel drawn by Ford with Hittite 𒈾𒀸𒋗 ‎(naššu, or) is neither supported nor ruled out by Kloekhorst.[2]

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /nʲɛs/

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Conjunction[edit]

nès

  1. (subordinating) because, since (expresses the reason for an action)
    Àš studijúoju, nès nóriu mókytis. - I study because I want to learn.

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gordon B Ford, Jr. (1965), 'A Note on Lithuanian "nes"', Die Sprache, volume 11 (1–2), pages 136–137.
  2. ^ Alwin Kloekhorst (2008), Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon, Leiden, Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, page 689

Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes m ‎(oblique plural nes, nominative singular nes, nominative plural nes)

  1. (anatomy) Alternative form of nés

Old Norse[edit]

Noun[edit]

nes n

  1. headland

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) nas

Etymology[edit]

From Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun[edit]

nes m

  1. (anatomy, Puter) nose

Welsh[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

nes ‎(superlative nesaf)

  1. nearer

Conjunction[edit]

nes

  1. until
Synonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

nes

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular preterite of gwneud

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 51 vi.