sen

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Japanese .

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛn/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Noun[edit]

sen (plural sens or sen)

  1. A unit of Japanese currency, worth one hundredth of a yen.
  2. A coin of this value.
    • 2013, Charles F. C. Ladd, Jr., Around the World at Seventeen (page 70)
      Before leaving the Kyndam I had bought in exchange what I thought to be enough yens and sens to see me through.

Etymology 2[edit]

From a syncopation of Middle English selven, selfen, variants of selfe, self. More at self.

Noun[edit]

sen

  1. (Yorkshire, East Midlands) self
    "Hear all, see all, say nowt. Ate all, sup all, pay nowt. An if ever tha does anythin for nowt, mek sure tha does it for tha sen."
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Thai เส้น (sên)

Noun[edit]

sen (uncountable)

  1. A unit of length equal 20 wa, 40 meters

Anagrams[edit]


Abenaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen (inanimate, plural senal)

  1. stone, rock
    senika
    there are a lot of rocks

Basque[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen ?

  1. mind

See also[edit]


Crimean Tatar[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *sen (thou), compare Turkish sen (you).

Pronoun[edit]

sen (plural siz, possessive adjective seniñ)

  1. you
Inflection
object your: saña
reflexive yourself: özüñ
possessive your: seniñ

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъ̀nъ, from Proto-Indo-European *supnós.

Noun[edit]

sen m inan

  1. dream
Declension[edit]

The form sna is usually only used after the preposition ze (ze sna) and the form snách is usually only used after the preposition ve (ve snách).

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the main entry.

Noun[edit]

sen

  1. genitive plural of seno (hay)

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse seinn (late), from Proto-Germanic *sainaz, *sainijaz, cognate with Old English sǣne.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sen (neuter sent, plural and definite singular attributive sene)

  1. late (proximate in time)
  2. belated, tardy
  3. slow

Inflection[edit]

Inflection of sen
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular sen senere senest2
Neuter singular sent senere senest2
Plural sene senere senest2
Definite attributive1 sene senere seneste
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

Esperanto[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

sen

  1. without

Derived terms[edit]

  • sen- (without, -less)

Finnish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

The genitive and genitive-looking accusative singular of the demonstrative pronoun se.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsen/, [ˈs̠e̞n]
  • Rhymes: -en
  • Syllabification: sen

Pronoun[edit]

sen

  1. Genitive singular form of se.
  2. (demonstrative) it (accusative; direct object)
    Voisitko tehdä sen?
    Could you do it, please?
  3. (demonstrative) its (genitive)
    Tuo rotta on varsinainen kiusankappale! Joudun keräämään sen jätöksiä kuistiltani joka aamu.
    That rat is really a nuisance! I have to gather its poopoo from my veranda every morning.
  4. (+ comparative) (the ...) the (establishes a parallel)
    Mitä enemmän, sen parempi.
    The more the better.

Inflection[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin sinus.

Noun[edit]

sen m (plural sens)

  1. (anatomy) bosom, breast
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen f

  1. want, need, desire

Galician[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese sen, from Latin sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

sen

  1. without
Antonyms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese sem; either from a substrate language, or more likely from Old Occitan sen (judgement) and ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *sinn (sense, mind) (cf. Vulgar Latin *sennus).[1]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen m (plural sens)

  1. (archaic) judgement
  2. (anatomy) temple
    Synonyms: tempa, vidalla

Etymology 3[edit]

Unknown.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen m (plural sens)

  1. (usually in the plural) fly maggots and eggs deposited in meat or food
    Synonyms: careixa, sese, vareixa

References[edit]

  • sem” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • sem” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • sen” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • sen” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • sen” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Ido[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Esperanto senFrench sansItalian senzaSpanish sin, ultimately from Latin sine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Preposition[edit]

sen

  1. without (not having)

Indonesian[edit]

Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɛn]
  • Hyphenation: sèn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Dutch cent, from Old French cent (hundred), from Latin centum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Noun[edit]

sèn (plural, first-person possessive senku, second-person possessive senmu, third-person possessive sennya)

  1. cent

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sèn (plural, first-person possessive senku, second-person possessive senmu, third-person possessive sennya)

  1. Nonstandard form of sein.

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Contraction[edit]

sen

  1. (literary, archaic) Contraction of se ne.

Usage notes[edit]

  • This contraction can be used only before verbs beginning with any consonant except for an impure s[1].

References[edit]


Japanese[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sen

  1. Rōmaji transcription of せん

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese cem.

Numeral[edit]

sen

  1. hundred (100)

Lashi[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from a Southeastern Asian language. Compare Burmese သိန်း (sin:) and Thai แสน (sɛ̌ɛn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

sen

  1. hundred thousand (100,000)

Usage notes[edit]

  • When used as a quantifier, sen should be preceded by da (one).

References[edit]

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis).

Latvian[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sen

  1. long ago, for a long time; adverbial form of sens
    tas noticis senit happened long ago
    viņš jau sen dzīvo Rīgāhe has lived in Riga for a long time

Malay[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛn/
  • Hyphenation: sèn

Etymology[edit]

From English cent, from Old French cent (hundred), from Latin centum, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱm̥tóm.

Noun[edit]

sen (Jawi spelling سين‎, plural sen-sen, informal 1st possessive senku, impolite 2nd possessive senmu, 3rd possessive sennya)

  1. cent

Further reading[edit]


Mandarin[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sen

  1. Nonstandard spelling of sēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of sěn.

Usage notes[edit]

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse seinn

Adjective[edit]

sen (neuter singular sent, definite singular and plural sene, comparative senere, indefinite superlative senest, definite superlative seneste)

  1. late

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Determiner[edit]

sen

  1. his own; her own; its own; their own

Related terms[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen m (oblique plural sens, nominative singular sens, nominative plural sen)

  1. Alternative form of sens

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *senos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sénos.

Adjective[edit]

sen (comparative siniu, superlative sinem)

  1. old

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
sen ṡen unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Descendants[edit]

  • Irish: sean

References[edit]

Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “sen”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language


Old Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sennus, of Germanic origin, from Frankish *sinn.

Noun[edit]

sen m (oblique plural sens, nominative singular sens, nominative plural sen)

  1. direction; orientation
  2. sense; ability to reason

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъ̀nъ, from Proto-Indo-European *súpnos.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen m inan

  1. dream
  2. sleep

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sen in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sen in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romani[edit]

Verb[edit]

sen

  1. second-person plural or formal singular present indicative of si
    2018, Yūsuke Sumi, ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, page 20:
    Tume sen rrom?
    Are you a Romani man?

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) si
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) se
  • (Puter, Vallader)

Etymology[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adverb[edit]

sen

  1. (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) up, upward, upwards

Slovak[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъ̀nъ, from Proto-Indo-European *supnós.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen m (genitive singular sna, nominative plural sny, genitive plural snov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. dream

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • sen in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Abbreviation of seno (sine).

Symbol[edit]

sen

  1. (mathematics) A symbol of the trigonometric function sine.

Swedish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sen

  1. late
    en sen kväll
    a late evening
    Jag är redan sen till ett möte
    I’m already late for a meeting
Declension[edit]
Inflection of sen
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular sen senare senast
Neuter singular sent senare senast
Plural sena senare senast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 sene senare senaste
All sena senare senaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Syncopic form of sedan, from Old Swedish siþan, from Old Norse síðan.

Adverb[edit]

sen

  1. Pronunciation spelling of sedan.
    Först gjorde vi si, och sen gjorde vi så
    First we did like this, and then we did like that

Anagrams[edit]


Tok Pisin[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From English chain.

Noun[edit]

sen

  1. chain

Etymology 2[edit]

From English cent.

Noun[edit]

sen

  1. cent

Descendants[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish سن(sen, thou), from Proto-Turkic *sen (thou). Cognate to siz (you) derived from the same root. Compare Old Turkic 𐰾𐰤(sen, you), Karakhanid سَنْ‏(sen, you).

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

sen

  1. you (singular, informal)

Declension[edit]

Usage notes[edit]
  • It is one of the two words that have irregular dative case declension. (The other words are ben and biz also have irregular genitive case declension.)

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Turkmen[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Turkic *sen (thou).

Pronoun[edit]

sen

  1. (personal) you (singular, informal)

Declension[edit]

See also[edit]


Uyghur[edit]

Romanization[edit]

sen

  1. Latin (ULY) transcription of سەن(sen)

Vietnamese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Chinese (OC *k.[r]ˤe[n]) (B-S) (SV: liên).

Noun[edit]

(classifier cây, bông, hoa) sen (𬞮)

  1. lotus

Derived terms[edit]

Derived terms

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

(classifier con) sen

  1. (slang, humorous) Owner of cat or dog.

Welsh[edit]

Verb[edit]

sen (not mutable)

  1. Contraction of basen.

Westrobothnian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse sin, from Proto-Germanic *senawō.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sen f (definite singular sena, definite plural senjen)

  1. Tendon.

Alternative forms[edit]