self

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See also: Self, šelf, self-, -self, and self.

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English self, silf, sulf, from Old English self, seolf, sylf, from Proto-Germanic *selbaz. Cognates include Gothic 𐍃𐌹𐌻𐌱𐌰 (silba), German selbst and Dutch zelf.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /sɛlf/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlf

Pronoun[edit]

self

  1. (obsolete) Himself, herself, itself, themselves; that specific (person mentioned).
    This argument was put forward by the defendant self.
  2. (commercial or humorous) Myself.
    I made out a cheque, payable to self, which cheered me up somewhat.

Noun[edit]

self (plural selves or selfs)

  1. One individual's personality, character, demeanor, or disposition.
    one's true self; one's better self; one's former self
  2. The subject of one's own experience of phenomena: perception, emotions, thoughts.
  3. An individual person as the object of the person's own reflective consciousness (plural selves).
    • 1859–1860, William Hamilton, “Lecture IX”, in H[enry] L[ongueville] Mansel and John Veitch, editors, Lectures on Metaphysics and Logic [], volume (please specify |volume=I to IV), Edinburgh; London: William Blackwood and Sons, OCLC 648725:
      The self, the I, is recognized in every act of intelligence as the subject to which that act belongs. It is I that perceive, I that imagine, I that remember, I that attend, I that compare, I that feel, I that will, I that am conscious.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XVI, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      The preposterous altruism too! [] Resist not evil. It is an insane immolation of self—as bad intrinsically as fakirs stabbing themselves or anchorites warping their spines in caves scarcely large enough for a fair-sized dog.
  4. Self-interest or personal advantage.
  5. Identity or personality.
  6. (botany) A seedling produced by self-pollination (plural selfs).
  7. (botany) A flower having its colour uniform as opposed to variegated.
  8. (molecular biology, immunology) Any molecule, cell, or tissue of an organism's own (belonging to the self), as opposed to a foreign (nonself) molecule, cell, or tissue (for example, infective, allogenic, or xenogenic).
    • 2000, Ristori, G, “Compositional bias and mimicry toward the nonself proteome in immunodominant T cell epitopes of self and nonself antigens”, in FASEB Journal: the official journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, volume 14, number 3, PMID 10698957, pages 431-438:
      Similarity profiles between helper T cell epitopes (of self or microbial antigens and allergens) and human or microbial SWISSPROT collections were produced. For each antigen, both collections yielded largely overlapping profiles, demonstrating that self-nonself discrimination does not rely on qualitative features that distinguish human from microbial peptides. [...] Epitopes (on self and nonself antigens) can cross-stimulate T cells at increasing potency as their similarity with nonself augments.
    • 2013 May-June, Katrina G. Claw, “Rapid Evolution in Eggs and Sperm”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 3:
      In plants, the ability to recognize self from nonself plays an important role in fertilization, because self-fertilization will result in less diverse offspring than fertilization with pollen from another individual.

Antonyms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

self (third-person singular simple present selfs, present participle selfing, simple past and past participle selfed)

  1. (botany) To fertilise by the same individual; to self-fertilise or self-pollinate.
  2. (botany) To fertilise by the same strain; to inbreed.

Antonyms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

self

  1. Having its own or a single nature or character throughout, as in colour, composition, etc., without addition or change; of the same kind; unmixed.
    a self bow: one made from a single piece of wood
    a self flower or plant: one which is wholly of one colour
  2. (obsolete) Same, identical.
  3. (obsolete) Belonging to oneself; own.
  4. (molecular biology, immunology) Of or relating to any molecule, cell, or tissue of an organism's own (belonging to the self), as opposed to a foreign (nonself) molecule, cell, or tissue (for example, infective, allogenic, or xenogenic).
    • 2000, Ristori, G, “Compositional bias and mimicry toward the nonself proteome in immunodominant T cell epitopes of self and nonself antigens”, in FASEB Journal: the official journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, volume 14, number 3, PMID 10698957, pages 431-438:
      Similarity profiles between helper T cell epitopes (of self or microbial antigens and allergens) and human or microbial SWISSPROT collections were produced. For each antigen, both collections yielded largely overlapping profiles, demonstrating that self-nonself discrimination does not rely on qualitative features that distinguish human from microbial peptides. However, epitopes whose probability of mimicry with self or nonself prevails are, respectively, tolerated or immunodominant and coexist within the same (auto-)antigen regardless of its self/nonself nature. Epitopes (on self and nonself antigens) can cross-stimulate T cells at increasing potency as their similarity with nonself augments.

Antonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

self

  1. (Internet slang) Abbreviation of selvfølgelig (of course).

Maltese[edit]

Root
s-l-f
5 terms

Etymology[edit]

From Arabic سَلَف(salaf).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

self m

  1. loan

Middle English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Old English self, from Proto-West Germanic *selb, from Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

self

  1. (the) (very/self) same, (the) aforementioned
  2. Intensifies the pronoun or noun it follows or precedes; very
  3. (+genitive) own

Descendants[edit]

  • English: self
  • Scots: self, sel

References[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

self

  1. themself, themselves; a reflexive pronoun
  2. that, this

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

Noun[edit]

self (plural selfs)

  1. (the) same thing, (the) aforementioned thing

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

self

  1. self

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Old Saxon[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *selbaz.

Pronoun[edit]

self

  1. self

Descendants[edit]