sel

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See also: Sel, sèl, sêl, šel, -sel, and sel-

Cahuilla[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sél

  1. flower

Extremaduran[edit]

Verb[edit]

sel

  1. to be

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Noun[edit]

sel m ‎(plural sels)

  1. table salt, i.e. sodium chloride (NaCl)
  2. (chemistry) salt
  3. (in the plural) smelling salts

Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sel

  1. rafsi of se.

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

sel m (plural sels)

  1. salt

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse selr.

Noun[edit]

sel m ‎(definite singular selen, indefinite plural seler, definite plural selene)

  1. a seal (marine mammal)

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse selr.

Noun[edit]

sel m ‎(definite singular selen, indefinite plural selar, definite plural selane)

  1. a seal (marine mammal)

See also[edit]

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *salą, from Indo-European. Cognate with Old High German sal, German Saal(hall, large room), Old Saxon sal, Dutch zaal. Compare sele, from a Germanic variant stem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sel n

  1. room, great hall, (large) house, castle
    Heorot, sincfāge sel‎ ― Heorot, richly adorned hall.
Related terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sēl (comparative sēlla, superlative sēlest)

  1. good, noble
    Sōna ic wæs wyrpende and mē sēl wæs.‎ ― Soon I was recovering and I was better.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • 1916, John R. Clark, "A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary for the Use of Students", sel et al.
  • Bosworth, J. (2010, March 21). An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), sel.

Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl.

Noun[edit]

sel m ‎(oblique plural seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative singular seaus or seax or siaus or siax or sels, nominative plural sel)

  1. salt

Descendants[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) sal

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun[edit]

sel m

  1. (Puter) salt

Slovene[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Slavic *sъlъ, from the same root as sláti.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sèl m anim ‎(genitive slà, nominative plural slì)

  1. messenger

Declension[edit]


Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from Arabic سَيْل(sayl).

Noun[edit]

sel

  1. flood