sal

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Contents

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English sealt; see salt. Compare Latin sal.

Noun[edit]

sal (uncountable)

  1. (chemistry, obsolete) salt
Usage notes[edit]

Was used predominantly to form the names of various chemical compounds.

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Hindi साल (sāl), from Sanskrit शाल (śāla).

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (plural sals)

  1. Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree.
    • 1989, Thomas Weber, Hugging the trees: the story of the Chipko movement, page 18:
      As the sals were cut in the lower foothill districts the loggers looked towards the mountains in their search for other hardwood timber.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afrikaans[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal (present sal, past sou)

  1. shall, will

Aragonese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

Noun[edit]

sal f

  1. salt

References[edit]


Asturian[edit]

Asturian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ast

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal m (plural sales)

  1. salt

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Occitan sal, from Latin sāl, salem, from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal f (plural sals)

  1. salt

Related terms[edit]


Chairel[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. sun

References[edit]

  • W. McCulloch, Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill tribes with a comparative vocabulary of the Munnipore and other languages (1859, Calcutta: Bengal Printing Company)

Chavacano[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Spanish sal (salt).

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. salt

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sol-, *sel-.

Noun[edit]

sal c (singular definite salen, plural indefinite sale)

  1. hall, room

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sal

  1. (text messaging) Abbreviation of saluton (hello).

Franco-Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Noun[edit]

sal f

  1. salt

Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. salt

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • sal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • sal” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • sal” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • sal” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Guinea-Bissau Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese sal. Cognates with Kabuverdianu sal.

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. salt

Icelandic[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. indefinite accusative singular of salur
  2. indefinite dative singular of salur

Interlingua[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (plural sales)

  1. salt (substance consisting of positive and negative ions)

Related terms[edit]


Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal f (genitive singular saile) or
sal m (genitive singular sail)

  1. Alternative form of sail (dirt; stain)

Declension[edit]

As masculine first-declension noun:

As feminine second-declension noun:

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sal shal
after an, tsal
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Istriot[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. salt

Kabuverdianu[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Portuguese sal.

Noun[edit]

sal

  1. salt

Kurdish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal f

  1. year

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-.

Cognates include Sanskrit सर (sará), Old Armenian աղ (), Ancient Greek ἅλς (háls), Tocharian A sāle, and Old English sealt (English salt).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sāl m (genitive salis); third declension

  1. salt
    cum grānō saliswith a grain of salt
  2. (figuratively) wit

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sāl salēs
Genitive salis salum
Dative salī salibus
Accusative salem salēs
Ablative sale salibus
Vocative sāl salēs

Usage notes[edit]

  • Occasionally found as neuter. A neuter by-form sale (genitive salis) is also occasionally found, e.g. in Ennius Ann. 385 and Varro d. Non. 223, 17.

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of sullen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse salr.

Noun[edit]

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall.
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sǫðull.

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural saler, definite plural salene)

  1. saddle

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse salr.

Noun[edit]

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. a large room in which parties and meetings and similar are held; a hall
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse sǫðull.

Noun[edit]

sal m (definite singular salen, indefinite plural salar, definite plural salane)

  1. saddle

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old Norse sal (payment).

Noun[edit]

sal n (definite singular salet, indefinite plural sal, definite plural sala)

  1. sale
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]


Novial[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal (past saled, active participle salent)

  1. (auxiliary) shall, will, goes in front of a verb in order to mark it as having the future tense

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *sailą (rope). Cognate with Old Saxon sēl (Dutch zeel), Old High German seil (German Seil).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sāl m

  1. rope, cord, rein

Declension[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]


Old Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin salem, accusative of sāl.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt
    • c. 1250, Alfonso X, Lapidario, f. 61r.
      Et ſu ṕpriedat es de aborrecer la ſal tanto que bié parece que a entramas grand enemiztat. ca ſi las ponen en uno. quiebra la piedra ¬ mueles; ¬ la ſal pierde la ſalgadumbre que a en ella.
      And its property is that it loathes salt so much that it would seem that there is a great enmity between them both, for if they are placed together, the stone breaks, and the salt loses all the saltiness within.

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Saleiros com sal.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Portuguese sal, from Latin sāl, salem (salt, wit), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l- (salt).

Noun[edit]

sal m (plural sais)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, a substance used as a condiment and preservative)
    Synonyms: cloreto de sódio, sal de cozinha
  2. (chemistry) salt (any compound formed from the reaction of an acid with a base)
  3. (usually in the plural) bath salt (any of several inorganic salts sometimes added to bath water)
    Synonym: sal de banho
  4. (figuratively) wit; the quality of being engaging
    Synonym: graça
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal m (plural sais)

  1. (rare) sal (Shorea robusta, a dipterocarpaceous tree)

Romanian[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Ottoman Turkish [Term?] (Turkish şal, from Persian شال(šāl).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal n (plural saluri)

  1. (rare) shawl, scarf
    Synonym: șal

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of salut.

Pronunciation[edit]

Interjection[edit]

sal!

  1. (informal) hey!
  2. (informal) bye!
Synonyms[edit]

Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem., from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Noun[edit]

sal m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) salt

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Spanish sal, from Latin sāl, salem (compare Catalan sal, French sel, Italian sale, Portuguese sal, Romanian sare), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-, a root shared by English salt.

Noun[edit]

sal f (plural sales)

  1. salt; table salt
  2. (chemistry) salt
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sal

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of salir.

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse salr, from Proto-Germanic *saliz, from Proto-Indo-European *sol-, *sel-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal c

  1. a large room (for dining or meetings)

Declension[edit]

Declension of sal 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sal salen salar salarna
Genitive sals salens salars salarnas

Related terms[edit]


Tocharian B[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Tocharian A trak

Adjective[edit]

sal

  1. dirty

Turkish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

Noun[edit]

sal (definite accusative salı, plural sallar)

  1. raft

Etymology 2[edit]

From Ottoman Turkish سل(sal, sel), from Arabic سَلَّ(salla, to draw, to unsheathe).

Verb[edit]

sal

  1. second-person singular imperative of salmak

References[edit]

  • Meninski, Franciszek à Mesgnien (1680), “sal”, in Thesaurus linguarum orientalium, Turcicae, Arabicae, Persicae, praecipuas earum opes à Turcis peculiariter usurpatas continens, nimirum Lexicon Turkico-Arabico-Persicum, Vienna, column 2647

Venetian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

Venetian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia vec

sal m (plural sałi)

  1. salt (sodium chloride, non-chemical usage)

sal m (plural sali)

  1. (chemistry) salt

Volapük[edit]

Noun[edit]

sal (nominative plural sals)

  1. salt

Declension[edit]