Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Bassa[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

  1. arrow

References[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of saber

Galician[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. second-person singular imperative of ser

Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʃeː/
  • (file)
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /ʃə/, /ʃɛ/ (pronoun only, not numeral)

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle Irish , from Old Irish é.

Pronoun[edit]

(emphatic form seisean, conjunctive)

  1. he; (referring to a masculine noun) it
See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Irish cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal :
    Ordinal : séú
    Personal : seisear

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *swexs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs. Compare Scottish Gaelic sia, Manx shey.

Numeral[edit]

  1. six
Usage notes[edit]
  • May be used with nouns in both the singular and plural; triggers lenition of nouns in the singular and h-prothesis of nouns in the plural:
  • chatsix cats
  • troithesix feet
  • huairesix times
  • When used with the definite article, the definite article is always in the plural. When used with nouns modified by adjectives, the adjective is also in the plural and is always lenited after nouns in the singular but only lenites after nouns in the plural when they end in slender consonants:
  • sé chapall bhánasix white horses
  • na sé eaglais mhórathe six big churches
But:
  • sé capaill bhánasix white horses
  • na sé heaglaisí mórathe six big churches
  • With personal nouns, the personal form seisear is used.
Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
shé
after an, tsé
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • "" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 1 sé” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 2 sé” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin .

Pronunciation[edit]

Pronoun[edit]

  1. oneself, himself, herself

Usage notes[edit]

  • Becomes se when in combination with verbs or other pronouns.
  • Becomes si when part of a reflexive verb.

Derived terms[edit]


Ladin[edit]

Verb[edit]

  1. first-person singular present indicative of savei

Pronoun[edit]

  1. oneself, himself, herself

Norman[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French sec, from Latin siccus, from Proto-Indo-European *seyk-.

Adjective[edit]

 m

  1. (Jersey) dry
Alternative forms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French seir, soir, from Latin sērō (at a late hour, late), from sērus (late).

Noun[edit]

 m (plural sés)

  1. (Jersey) evening
Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Old French sel, from Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

 m (plural sés)

  1. (Jersey) salt
Alternative forms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Celtic *swexs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs.

Pronunciation[edit]

Numeral[edit]

Old Irish cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal :
    Ordinal : seissed

  1. six

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • ” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese see, from Latin sēdēs (seat), from sedeō (I sit), from Proto-Indo-European *sed- (to sit).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛ/
  • Hyphenation:
  • Homophone:

Noun[edit]

f (plural sés)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) see (the cathedral and region under the jurisdiction of a bishop)

Derived terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈse/
  • Homophones: se, ce (non-Castilian)
  • Rhymes: -e

Etymology 1[edit]

See saber

Verb[edit]

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of saber.
    No .
    I do not know.

Etymology 2[edit]

See ser

Verb[edit]

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of ser.
    ¡ un voluntario!
    Be a volunteer!

Etymology 3[edit]

See

Interjection[edit]

  1. (colloquial, Chile, Mexico) yes

Sranan Tongo[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Dutch zee.

Noun[edit]

  1. sea

Walloon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French sel, from Latin sāl, salem.

Noun[edit]

 ?

  1. salt