saber

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

saber ‎(plural sabers)

  1. Alternative spelling of sabre

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Verb[edit]

saber ‎(third-person singular simple present sabers, present participle sabering, simple past and past participle sabered)

  1. Alternative spelling of sabre

Asturian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste).

Verb[edit]

saber

  1. to know

Related terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p-(to try, to research).

Verb[edit]

saber ‎(first-person singular present , past participle sabut)

  1. to know (a fact), to have knowledge
  2. to know how to

Conjugation[edit]

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References[edit]


Galician[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste).

Verb[edit]

saber ‎(first-person singular present sei, first-person singular preterite souben, past participle sabido)

  1. to know (a fact)
  2. to know how to do (something)
  3. first-person singular personal infinitive of saber
  4. third-person singular personal infinitive of saber

Usage notes[edit]

Like Portuguese and Spanish, Galician has two different verbs that are usually translated to English as “to know”. The verb saber relates to factual knowledge and skills. In contrast, the verb coñecer relates to familiarity with people or places.

Conjugation[edit]

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Occitan[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Provençal saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste).

Verb[edit]

saber

  1. to know

Conjugation[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Old Provençal[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste).

Verb[edit]

saber

  1. to taste (have a certain taste)
  2. to know

Noun[edit]

saber m ‎(oblique plural sabers, nominative singular sabers, nominative plural saber)

  1. knowledge

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Portuguese saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste; I am wise), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p-(to try, to research).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

saber ‎(first-person singular present indicative sei, past participle sabido)

  1. (transitive) to know [a fact]
    Perguntaram-me a resposta, mas eu não sabia.
    They asked me the answer, but I didn’t know.
    Sei que é verdade.
    I know it’s true.
  2. (transitive) to know [a value or piece of information]
    Eu sei qual é a capital da Assíria.
    I know what the capital of Assyria is.
    Ele sabe duzentos algarismos do número neperiano.
    He knows two hundred digits of Euler’s number.
    Ninguém sabe qual é a velocidade aérea média de uma andorinha não carregada.
    Nobody knows what the average airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow is.
  3. (auxiliary with a verb in the impersonal infinitive) to know [how to do something]
    Não sei como fazer isso, mas ela sabe.
    I don’t know how to do this, but she knows.
    Sabes falar russo?
    Do you know how to speak Russian?
  4. (transitive with de or sobre (less common)) to know about; to have heard about (to be aware of the existence of, or of some information about)
    Soube da explosão que houve no centro?
    Have you heard about the downtown explosion?
  5. (transitive) to know [a skill]
    Os selvagens não sabiam matemática.
    The savages didn’t know mathematics.
  6. (now very formal, transitive with a) to taste of (to have the same taste as)
    Um bom vinho sabe a carvalho.
    A good wine tastes like oak.
  7. (now very formal, intransitive) to have a pleasant taste
    Como sabe esse vinho!
    How good does this wine taste!

Conjugation[edit]

Quotations[edit]

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:saber.

Synonyms[edit]

Noun[edit]

saber m (plural saberes)

  1. knowledge; lore (intellectual understanding)

Synonyms[edit]

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Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō(I taste), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p-(to try, to research).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /saˈbeɾ/, [saˈβeɾ]

Verb[edit]

saber ‎(first-person singular present , first-person singular preterite supe, past participle sabido)

  1. to know (a fact)
    que volverá – I know it'll come back
  2. to know how to do something
    Sabe hablar español – He knows how to speak Spanish
  3. to taste
    Sabe a pollo – It tastes like chicken

Conjugation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

saber m ‎(uncountable)

  1. knowledge