sap

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See also: SAP, sáp, sắp, sæp, s.ap., -sap, Sap., and sāp

English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English sap, from Old English sæp (juice, sap), from Proto-Germanic *sapą (sap, juice) (compare Dutch sap, German Saft, Icelandic safi), from Proto-Indo-European *sab-, *sap- (to taste) (compare Welsh syb-wydd (fir), Latin sapa (must, new wine), Russian со́пли (sópli, snivel), Armenian համ (ham, juice, taste), Avestan 𐬬𐬌-𐬱𐬁𐬞𐬀 (vi-šāpa, having poisonous juices), Sanskrit सबर् (sabar, juice, nectar)). More at sage.

Noun[edit]

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sap (countable and uncountable, plural saps)

  1. (uncountable) The juice of plants of any kind, especially the ascending and descending juices or circulating fluid essential to nutrition.
  2. (uncountable) The sapwood, or alburnum, of a tree.
  3. (slang, countable) A simpleton; a saphead; a milksop; a naive person.
    "What a sap!" ― Eddy from Ed, Edd n Eddy
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from sapling.

Noun[edit]

sap (plural saps)

  1. (countable, US, slang) A short wooden club; a leather-covered hand weapon; a blackjack.
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Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sap (third-person singular simple present saps, present participle sapping, simple past and past participle sapped)

  1. (transitive, slang) To strike with a sap (with a blackjack).
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From French saper (compare Spanish zapar and Italian zappare) from sape (sort of scythe), from Late Latin sappa (sort of mattock).

Noun[edit]

sap (plural saps)

  1. (military) A narrow ditch or trench made from the foremost parallel toward the glacis or covert way of a besieged place by digging under cover of gabions, etc.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

sap (third-person singular simple present saps, present participle sapping, simple past and past participle sapped)

  1. (transitive) To subvert by digging or wearing away; to mine; to undermine; to destroy the foundation of.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Dryden
      Nor safe their dwellings were, for sapped by floods, / Their houses fell upon their household gods.
  2. (transitive, military) To pierce with saps.
  3. (transitive) To make unstable or infirm; to unsettle; to weaken.
  4. (transitive) To gradually weaken.
    to sap one’s conscience
  5. (intransitive) To proceed by mining, or by secretly undermining; to execute saps.
Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin *sappō, from Latin sappa. Compare Romanian săpa, sap, French saper, Italian zappare, Sicilian zappari, Spanish zapar, Friulian sapâ, Venetian sapar, Latin sappa.

Verb[edit]

sap (past participle sãpatã)

  1. I dig (with a pick).

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

sap

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of saber

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch sap, from Old Dutch *sap, from Proto-Germanic *sapą. Cognate to English sap and German Saft (from Old High German saf).[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sap n (plural sappen, diminutive sapje n)

  1. sap (fluid in plants)
  2. juice
    Hyponyms: aalbessensap, appelsap, citroensap, druivensap, sinaasappelsap, vruchtensap

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Anagrams[edit]


Lojban[edit]

Rafsi[edit]

sap

  1. rafsi of sampu.

Romani[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Sanskrit सर्प (sarpá, snake).

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

sap m

  1. snake

Turkish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Turkic sap, from Proto-Turkic.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sap

  1. shaft

Volapük[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin sapiō (I am wise).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sap

  1. wisdom

Zhuang[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Standard Zhuang) IPA(key): /θaːp˧˥/
  • Tone numbers: sap7
  • Hyphenation: sap

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Tai *saːpᴰ (cockroach). Cognate with Thai สาบ (sàap), Lao ສາບ (sāp), Shan သၢပ်ႇ (saap2).

Noun[edit]

sap (old orthography sap, Sawndip forms 𫊷)

  1. cockroach

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sap (old orthography sap)

  1. to wear shoes with the heels stepping down on the back of the shoes