fluid

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See also: Fluid

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fluid, from Latin fluidus (flowing; fluid), from Latin fluō (to flow), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁- (to swell; surge; overflow; run). Akin to Ancient Greek φλύειν (phlúein, to swell; overflow). Not related to English flow, which is a native, inherited word from *plew-.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfluːɪd/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈfljuːɪd/[1]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːɪd

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

fluid (countable and uncountable, plural fluids)

  1. Any substance which can flow with relative ease, tends to assume the shape of its container, and obeys Bernoulli's principle; a liquid, gas or plasma.
    • 2013 March 1, Frank Fish, George Lauder, “Not Just Going with the Flow”, in American Scientist[1], volume 101, number 2, page 114:
      An extreme version of vorticity is a vortex. The vortex is a spinning, cyclonic mass of fluid, which can be observed in the rotation of water going down a drain, as well as in smoke rings, tornados and hurricanes.
  2. A liquid (as opposed to a solid or gas).
    • 1992, Christopher G. Morris, Academic Press, Christopher W. Morris, Academic Press Dictionary of Science and Technology, Gulf Professional Publishing (→ISBN), page 854:
      fluid inclusion Petrology, a tiny fluid- or gas-filled cavity in an igneous rock. 1-100 micrometers in diameter, formed by the entrapment of a fluid, typically that from which the rock crystallized.
    • 2006, Jörg Fitter, Thomas Gutberlet, Neutron Scattering in Biology: Techniques and Applications, Springer Science & Business Media (→ISBN), page 236:
      For studying interfaces between solid and another solid, fluid, or gas, a sample can be oriented with its reflecting surface(s) vertical (and with the scattering plane, as defined by nominal incident and reflected wavevectors, horizontal).
    • 2011, Andrew T Raftery, Michael S. Delbridge, Marcus J. D. Wagstaff, Churchill's Pocketbook of Surgery, International Edition E-Book, Elsevier Health Sciences (→ISBN), page 11:
      Tenderness: is the lump tender?
      Composition: is the mass solid, fluid or gas?
    • 2012, Will Pettijohn P.E.C., Oil & Gas Handbook: A Roughneck's guide to the Universe, AuthorHouse (→ISBN), page 23:
      The choke manifold then expels the fluid or gas to the gas buster or a panic line. The panic line will then either send the fluid or gas to the reserve pit or a flare stack or flare tank.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:fluid.
  3. (specifically, medicine, colloquial, typically in the plural) Intravenous fluids.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fluid (comparative more fluid, superlative most fluid)

  1. (not comparable) Of or relating to fluid.
  2. In a state of flux; subject to change.
    • 2013 August 3, “Boundary problems”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8847:
      Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.
  3. Moving smoothly, or giving the impression of a liquid in motion.
  4. (of an asset) Convertible into cash.
  5. (rare) Genderfluid.
    • 2017, Rick Riordan, Magnus Chase and the Hammer of Thor (→ISBN), page 274 (the genderfluid character Alex Fierro is speaking):
      “Oh, Loki made sure of that. My mortal parents blamed him for the way I was, for being fluid.”

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fluid” in John Walker, A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary [] , London: Sold by G. G. J. and J. Robinſon, Paternoſter Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1791, →OCLC, page 245.

Further reading[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fluid (feminine fluida, masculine plural fluids, feminine plural fluides)

  1. fluid

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fluid m (plural fluids)

  1. fluid

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fluid (not comparable)

  1. fluid

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Noun[edit]

fluid n (definite singular fluidet, indefinite plural fluid or fluider, definite plural fluida or fluidene)

  1. a fluid

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Noun[edit]

fluid n (definite singular fluidet, indefinite plural fluid, definite plural fluida)

  1. a fluid

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /flûiːd/
  • Hyphenation: flu‧id

Noun[edit]

flȕīd m (Cyrillic spelling флу̏ӣд)

  1. fluid

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

fluid

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of fluir.