cash

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See also: Cash

English[edit]

Cash depicted in the form of coins, banknotes, and moneybags.

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle French caisse (money box), from Old Occitan caissa, from Old Italian cassa, from Latin capsa (box, case), from capiō (I take, I seize, I receive), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂p- (to grasp).

Noun[edit]

cash (usually uncountable, plural cashes)

  1. (uncountable) Money in the form of notes/bills and coins, as opposed to cheques/checks or electronic transactions.
    After you bounced those checks last time, they want to be paid in cash.
  2. (uncountable, finance) Liquid assets, money that can be traded quickly, as distinct from assets that are invested and cannot be easily exchanged.
    • 2013 July 6, “The rise of smart beta”, in The Economist[1], volume 408, number 8843, page 68:
      Cash offers a return of virtually zero in many developed countries [] .
  3. (uncountable, informal) Money.
    • 2017, Erin Lowry, Broke Millenial[2], page 146:
      Paying yourself first also implies that you have some understanding of your cash flow, which means that, yes, you must set a budget.
  4. (countable, Canada) Cash register.
  5. (countable, gambling) An instance of winning a cash prize.
    • 2012, Jonathan Little, Secrets of Professional Tournament Poker, Volume 2:
      In the WSOP, I have played around 150 tournaments with one final table, 11 cashes, and a -70 percent ROI.
  6. (countable, archaic) A place where money is kept, or where it is deposited and paid out; a money box.
    • 1787 [1764], Adam Anderson, quoting William Temple, An Historical And Chronological Deduction Of The Origin Of Commerce, From the Earliest Accounts[3], volume 1, page 236:
      This bank [] is properly a general cash, where every man lodges his money,
    • 1852, Theresa Lewis, quoting a letter from John More to Ralph Winwood, Lives of the Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon[4], volume 2, page 321:
      She was said to have amassed a great sum of money for ill use ; 20,000l. are known to be in her cash ;
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Japanese: キャッシュ (kyasshu)
  • Serbo-Croatian: kȅš, ке̏ш
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]

Verb[edit]

cash (third-person singular simple present cashes, present participle cashing, simple past and past participle cashed)

  1. (transitive) To exchange (a check/cheque) for money in the form of notes/bills.
  2. (poker slang) To obtain a payout from a tournament.
Derived terms[edit]
Terms derived from the verb to cash
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

cash (comparative more cash, superlative most cash)

  1. (slang) Great; excellent; cool.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Tamil காசு (kācu).[1]

Noun[edit]

cash (plural cashes or cash)

  1. Any of several low-denomination coins of India, China, or Vietnam, especially the Chinese copper coin.

Translations[edit]


References[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

See cashier.

Verb[edit]

cash (third-person singular simple present cashes, present participle cashing, simple past and past participle cashed)

  1. To disband. To do away with, kill
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Garges to this entry?)

Anagrams[edit]


Aromanian[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cāseus. Compare Romanian caș.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cash n (plural cãshuri)

  1. cheese

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English cash.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cash m (uncountable)

  1. (informal) cash

Adjective[edit]

cash (invariable, not comparable)

  1. (informal, of money) In coins and bills/notes.
    • Heb je cash geld? — Do you have cash?

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English cash.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adverb[edit]

cash

  1. (colloquial) in cash (of paying)
  2. (colloquial) bluntly, directly, straight up

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]