capsa

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See also: Capsa

Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin capsa. Doublet of caixa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

capsa f (plural capses)

  1. box

Usage notes[edit]

There is a semantical difference in the usage of caixa and capsa according to their size. Boxes larger than a shoebox are usually called caixa, while boxes smaller than a shoebox (e.g. for matches, confectioneries, pills) are capsa.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latinism, borrowed from Latin capsa.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈka.psa/
  • Rhymes: -apsa
  • Hyphenation: cà‧psa

Noun[edit]

capsa f (plural capsae)

  1. (historical, Ancient Rome) a cylindrical container used chiefly to store books
  2. a drawer where archived documents are stored

References[edit]

  • capsa in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • capsa in Dizionario Italiano Olivetti, Olivetti Media Communication

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From capiō (capture, seize, take), possibly a relic of a sigmatic aorist stem in Proto-Italic that later merged with the perfective tense. Compare Latin noxa from noceō, also Ancient Greek σκᾰ́ψᾱς (skápsās), masculine nominative active indicative aorist participle of σκάπτω (skáptō) (not cognate with the Latin term).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

capsa f (genitive capsae); first declension

  1. A box, case, holder, repository; especially a cylindrical container for books; bookcase.

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative capsa capsae
Genitive capsae capsārum
Dative capsae capsīs
Accusative capsam capsās
Ablative capsā capsīs
Vocative capsa capsae

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Borrowings

References[edit]

  • capsa in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • capsa in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • capsa in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • capsa in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • capsa in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • capsa in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly
  • capsa in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  • capsa in Richard Stillwell et al., editor (1976) The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press
  • Coromines, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1983–1991), “caja”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), volume A–Ca, Madrid: Gredos, →ISBN, page 740

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From capsă.

Verb[edit]

a capsa (third-person singular present capsează, past participle capsat1st conj.

  1. to staple, fasten

Conjugation[edit]