fasten

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See also: Fasten and fästen

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English fastenen, from Old English fæstnian, from Proto-West Germanic *fastinōn (to secure, fasten). Equivalent to fast +‎ -en.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fasten (third-person singular simple present fastens, present participle fastening, simple past and past participle fastened)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To attach or connect in a secure manner.
    The sailor fastened the boat to the dock with a half-hitch.
    Fasten your seatbelts!
    Can you fasten these boards together with some nails?
    • May 31, 1711, Jonathan Swift, The Examiner No. 43
      The words Whig and Tory have been pressed to the service of many successions of parties, with very different ideas fastened to them.
  2. To cause to take close effect; to make to tell; to land.
    to fasten a blow

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Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Middle High German vasten, from Old High German fastēn, from Proto-Germanic *fastāną.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

fasten (weak, third-person singular present fastet, past tense fastete, past participle gefastet, auxiliary haben)

  1. to fast
Conjugation[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaːstən/
  • Hyphenation: fas‧ten; pre-1996: fa‧sten

Verb[edit]

fasten

  1. inflection of fasen:
    1. first/third-person plural preterite
    2. first/third-person plural subjunctive II

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Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Noun[edit]

fasten m or f

  1. definite masculine singular of faste

Old High German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Germanic *fastāną.

Verb[edit]

fastēn

  1. to fast

Conjugation[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle High German: vasten