faste

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See also: fäste and Fäste

Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse fasta, from Proto-Germanic *fastǭ (fast), cognate with German Fasten. Like the verb, derived from the adjective Proto-Germanic *fastuz (firm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

faste c (singular definite fasten, plural indefinite faster)

  1. fast (abstain from food)
  2. (Christianity) Lent (period before Easter)
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse fasta, from Proto-Germanic *fastāną (to fast). Cognate with English fast and German fasten. Derived from the adjective Proto-Germanic *fastuz (firm).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

faste (imperative fast, infinitive at faste, present tense faster, past tense fastede, perfect tense har fastet)

  1. to fast (to go without food)

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faste

  1. plural of fast

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin fastus.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /fast/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

faste m (plural fastes)

  1. splendour; pomp [since 1540]
    • 2020 October 11, “La Corée du Nord dévoile de nouveaux missiles et tend la main au Sud”, in Le Monde[1]:
      Dans la nuit, les monuments et gratte-ciel de Pyongyang brillant de toutes leurs lumières, la cérémonie sur la place Kim-Il-sung, dont le pavillon abritant la tribune officielle avait été rénové et recouvert de marbre gris, s'est déroulée dans le faste et la liesse populaire programmée des grands événements en RPDC.
      In the night, the monuments and skyscrapers of Pyongyang shining with all their lights, the ceremony on Kim Il-sung square—whose pavilion hosting the official stand had been renovated and recovered with grey marble—took place in the pomp and popular jubilation programmed for major events in the DPRK.

Usage notes[edit]

  • The plural is uncommon.

Derived terms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faste (plural fastes)

  1. auspicious, lucky [since 1946]
    Antonym: néfaste
  2. (historical, relational) of dies fasti, days of the Roman calendar in which public business was conducted [isolated example in c. 1380; continuously since 1838]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

faste

  1. inflection of fasten:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfaːstə/
  • Hyphenation: fas‧te

Verb[edit]

faste

  1. inflection of fasen:
    1. first/third-person singular preterite
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive II

Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

fāste

  1. vocative singular of fāstus

References[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faste

  1. definite singular of fast
  2. plural of fast

Etymology 2[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

From Old Norse fasta.

Noun[edit]

faste f or m (definite singular fasta or fasten, indefinite plural faster, definite plural fastene)

  1. a fast (act or practice of abstaining from or eating very little food)

Verb[edit]

faste (imperative fast, present tense faster, simple past and past participle fasta or fastet)

  1. to fast (abstain from food and drink for a certain period)

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faste

  1. definite singular of fast
  2. plural of fast

Etymology 2[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse fasta.

Noun[edit]

faste f (definite singular fasta, indefinite plural faster, definite plural fastene)

  1. a fast (as above)

References[edit]


Plautdietsch[edit]

Verb[edit]

faste

  1. to fast

Swedish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

faste

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of fast.

Anagrams[edit]