fastus

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Esperanto[edit]

Verb[edit]

fastus

  1. conditional of fasti

Ido[edit]

Verb[edit]

fastus

  1. conditional of fastar

Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From fās.

Adjective[edit]

fastus (feminine fasta, neuter fastum); first/second declension

  1. allowed (not forbidden)
Inflection[edit]

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative fastus fasta fastum fastī fastae fasta
genitive fastī fastae fastī fastōrum fastārum fastōrum
dative fastō fastō fastīs
accusative fastum fastam fastum fastōs fastās fasta
ablative fastō fastā fastō fastīs
vocative faste fasta fastum fastī fastae fasta
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

For fastus dies, from fastus above.

Noun[edit]

fastus m (genitive fastī); second declension

  1. A day on which courts sat
  2. court register
  3. calendar, almanac
Inflection[edit]

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fastus fastī
genitive fastī fastōrum
dative fastō fastīs
accusative fastum fastōs
ablative fastō fastīs
vocative faste fastī

Etymology 3[edit]

May be from Proto-Indo-European *bʰérstus, from *bʰers- (tip). See also fastīgium.[1]

Noun[edit]

fastus m (genitive fastūs); fourth declension

  1. scornful contempt or disdain of others, haughtiness, arrogance, pride
Inflection[edit]

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative fastus fastūs
genitive fastūs fastuum
dative fastuī fastibus
accusative fastum fastūs
ablative fastū fastibus
vocative fastus fastūs
Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • fastus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • fastus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “fastus”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • fastus” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) the calender (list of fasts and festivals): fasti
  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume I, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 110