pine

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See also: piné

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /paɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪn

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English pyne, from Latin pīnus, from Proto-Indo-European *peyH- (sap, juice). Cognate with Sanskrit पितु (pitu, sap, juice, resin). Doublet of pinus.

Noun[edit]

pine (countable and uncountable, plural pines)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Any coniferous tree of the genus Pinus.
    Synonyms: pine tree, pinus
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes. Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Miss Thyrza’s Chair”, in The China Governess: A Mystery, London: Chatto & Windus, OCLC 483591931, page 41:
      Sepia Delft tiles surrounded the fireplace, their crudely drawn Biblical scenes in faded cyclamen blending with the pinkish pine, while above them, instead of a mantelshelf, there was an archway high enough to form a balcony with slender balusters and a tapestry-hung wall behind.
    The northern slopes were covered mainly in pine.
  2. (countable) Any tree (usually coniferous) which resembles a member of this genus in some respect.
  3. (uncountable) The wood of this tree.
    Synonym: pinewood
  4. (archaic except Caribbean, Guyana, South Africa) A pineapple.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English pine, pyne, from Old English *pīn (pain), from Proto-Germanic *pīnō (pain, torment, torture), possibly from Latin poena (punishment), from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney). Cognate to pain.

Entered Germanic with Christianity; cognate to Middle Dutch pinen, Old High German pīnōn, Old Norse pína.[1]

Noun[edit]

pine (plural pines)

  1. (archaic) A painful longing.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English pinen, from Old English pīnian (to torment), from Proto-Germanic *pīnōną, from Proto-Germanic *pīnō (pain, torment, torture), from the noun (see above). Cognate with German peinigen (to torment, torture), Icelandic pína (to torment).

Verb[edit]

pine (third-person singular simple present pines, present participle pining, simple past and past participle pined)

  1. (intransitive) To languish; to lose flesh or wear away through distress.
    Synonyms: languish, droop
    • 1589 or 1590, Christopher Marlowe, The Jew of Malta, Act I.iii.256:
      Why pine not I, and die in this distress?
    • 170?, Thomas Tickell, To a Lady; With a Present of Flowers:
      This night shall see the gaudy wreath decline, The roses wither and the lilies pine.
    • 1855, John Sullivan Dwight (translator), “Oh Holy Night”, as printed in 1871, Adolphe-Charles Adam (music), “Cantique de Noël”, G. Schirmer (New York), originally by Placide Cappeau de Roquemaure, 1847
      Long lay the world in sin and error pining / Till He appear’d and the soul felt its worth
    • 1994, Walter Dean Myers, The Glory Field[1], →ISBN, page 29:
      The way the story went was that the man's foot healed up all right but that he just pined away.
    • 2001 May 15, Tool (lyrics and music), “Reflection”, in Lateralus[2], track 11:
      Before I pine away (Pine away)
  2. (intransitive) To long, to yearn so much that it causes suffering.
    Synonyms: long, yearn
    Laura was pining for Bill all the time he was gone.
    • 1969 December 7, Monty Python, “Full Frontal Nudity, Dead Parrot sketch”, in Monty Python's Flying Circus, spoken by shopkeeper and Mr Praline (Michael Palin and John Cleese):
      Praline: "That parrot is definitely deceased. And when I bought it not half an hour ago you assured me that its lack of movement was due to it being tired and shagged out after a long squawk."
      Shopkeeper: "It's probably pining for the fiords."
      Praline: "Pining for the fiords, what kind of talk is that?"
    • 2016 August 14, Ross Douthat, “A Playboy for President”, in The New York Times[3]:
      Ten years ago, liberals pined for a post-religious right, a different culture war. Be careful what you wish for.
    • 2019 August 14, A. A. Dowd, “Good Boys Puts a Tween Spin on the R-rated Teen Comedy, to Mostly Funny Effect”, in The A.V. Club[4], archived from the original on 4 March 2021:
      Of the group, Max (Room’s Jacob Tremblay) is the most nominally mature, at least biologically speaking; unlike his childhood companions, he’s entered the early throes of puberty, and spends a lot of his waking hours pining, rather chastely, for a classmate (Millie Davis).
  3. (transitive) To grieve or mourn for.
    • 1674, John Milton, “Book XI”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem in Twelve Books, 2nd edition, London: [] S[amuel] Simmons [], OCLC 563123917, pages 299–300:
      [T]hou mayſt know / What miſerie th' inabſtinence of Eve / Shall bring on men. Immediately a place / Before his eyes appeard, ſad, noyſom, dark, / A Lazar-houſe it ſeemd, wherein were laid / Numbers all diſeas'd, [] / [] / Dæmoniac Phrenzie, moaping Melancholie / And Moon-ſtruck madneſs, pining Atrophie, / Maraſmus and wide-waſting Peſtilence.
  4. (transitive) To inflict pain upon; to torment.
    Synonyms: torment, torture, afflict
    • 1648, Joseph Hall, “The Breathings of the Devout Soul”, in Josiah Pratt, editor, The Works of the Right Reverend Father in God, Joseph Hall, D.D. [], volume VI (Devotional Works), London: Printed by C[harles] Whittingham, []; for Williams and Smith, [], published 1808, OCLC 1190972734, section XXVII, page 325:
      Which way, O Lord, which way can I look, and not see some sad examples of misery? [] [O]ne is pined in prison; another, tortured on the rack; a third, languisheth under the loss of a dear son, or wife, or husband.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo.svg pine on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • pine” in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • pine at OneLook Dictionary Search

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “pine”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams[edit]


Bih[edit]

Noun[edit]

pine

  1. woman, girl

Further reading[edit]

  • Tam Thi Min Nguyen, A grammar of Bih (2013)

Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Via Old Saxon pīna from Medieval Latin pēna (punishment in hell), from Latin poena (punishment), a loan from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ, penalty, fine, bloodmoney).

Noun[edit]

pine c (singular definite pinen, plural indefinite piner)

  1. torment
  2. (in compounds) ache
Inflection[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German pīnen, derived from the noun.

Verb[edit]

pine (imperative pin, infinitive at pine, present tense piner, past tense pinte, perfect tense er/har pint)

  1. torment
  2. torture
Synonyms[edit]

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Originally “pinecone”, from Latin pīnea

Noun[edit]

pine f (plural pines)

  1. (slang) nob, penis

Etymology 2[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb[edit]

pine

  1. inflection of piner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Noun[edit]

pine f

  1. plural of pina

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

pīne

  1. vocative singular of pīnus

Maori[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Probably English pin

Noun[edit]

pine

  1. pin, tack, brooch

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pína, from Latin poena.

Noun[edit]

pine f or m (definite singular pina or pinen, indefinite plural piner, definite plural pinene)

  1. pain, torment, torture

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pine (present tense piner, past tense pinte, past participle pint)

  1. to torment, to torture

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse pína, from Latin poena

Noun[edit]

pine f (definite singular pina, indefinite plural piner, definite plural pinene)

  1. pain, torment, torture

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

pine (present tense piner, past tense pinte, past participle pint, passive infinitive pinast, present participle pinande, imperative pin)

  1. to torment, to torture

References[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

pine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of pinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of pinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of pinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of pinar

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian pīne, borrowed from Latin pēna, borrowed from Ancient Greek ποινή (poinḗ). Cognates include Saterland Frisian Piene and Dutch pijn.

Noun[edit]

pine c (plural pinen, diminutive pyntsje)

  1. pain, ache

Further reading[edit]

  • pine”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Zazaki[edit]

Noun[edit]

pine

  1. patch
  2. (computing) patch