plage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Plage, plagë, and plåge

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French plage, from Late Latin plagia from plaga (region). Doublet of flake.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pleɪdʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Noun[edit]

plage (plural plages)

  1. (geography, obsolete) A region viewed in the context of its climate; a clime or zone.
    • a. 1547, Edward Hall, Hall's chronicle, J. Johnson, published 1809, page 252:
      King Henry and his faction nesteled and strēgthēd him and his alies in the North regions and boreal plage.
    • c. 1587–1588, [Christopher Marlowe], Tamburlaine the Great. [] The First Part [], part 1, 2nd edition, London: [] [R. Robinson for] Richard Iones, [], published 1592, OCLC 932920499; reprinted as Tamburlaine the Great (A Scolar Press Facsimile), Menston, Yorkshire; London: Scolar Press, 1973, →ISBN, Act IV, scene iv:
      TAMBURLAINE. Kings of Argier, Morocco, and of Fez,
      You that have march'd with happy Tamburlaine
      As far as from the frozen plage of heaven
      Unto the watery Morning's ruddy bower, []
    • 1626, [Samuel] Purchas, “Of the New World”, in Purchas His Pilgrimes. [], 5th part, London: [] William Stansby for Henrie Fetherstone, [], OCLC 960103045, 8th book, page 792:
      In the Heauens, they supposed a burning Zone; in the Earth, a Plage [translating Latin plaga], plagued with scorching heats.
  2. (astronomy) A bright region in the chromosphere of the Sun.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /plaːɡə/, [ˈpʰlæːjə]

Noun[edit]

plage c (singular definite plagen, plural indefinite plager)

  1. nuisance, pest

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

plage (imperative plag, infinitive at plage, present tense plager, past tense plagede, perfect tense har plaget)

  1. bully
  2. pester
  3. worry

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

plage

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of plagen

French[edit]

Wikipedia-logo.png
 plage on French Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin plagia, Cognate with Catalan platja, Galician praia, Italian spiaggia, Occitan plaja, Portuguese praia, and Spanish playa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

plage f (plural plages)

  1. beach
  2. (mathematics) range

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

plage

  1. inflection of plagen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Old French plage, from Latin plāga (blow, wound).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

plage (plural plages)

  1. plague
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Noun[edit]

plage

  1. (geography) a region; country

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin plaga, via Low German plage and Old Norse plága.

Noun[edit]

plage f or m (definite singular plaga or plagen, indefinite plural plager, definite plural plagene)

  1. a plague (especially biblical)
  2. an affliction, illness, pain
  3. a bother, nuisance, pest, worry

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse plága.

Verb[edit]

plage (imperative plag, present tense plager, passive plages, simple past plaga or plaget or plagde, past participle plaga or plaget or plagd, present participle plagende)

  1. to afflict, bother, pester, plague, torment, trouble

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin plaga, via Low German plage and Old Norse plága.

Noun[edit]

plage f (definite singular plaga, indefinite plural plager, definite plural plagene)

  1. a plague (especially biblical)
  2. an affliction, illness, pain
  3. a bother, nuisance, pest, worry

References[edit]