beach

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Beach in Pagudpud, Ilocos Norte, Philippines.

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English bache, bæcche (bank, sandbank), from Old English bæċe, beċe (beck, brook, stream), from Proto-Germanic *bakiz (brook), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰog- (flowing water). Cognate with Dutch beek (brook, stream), German Bach (brook, stream), Swedish bäck (stream, brook, creek). More at batch, beck.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

beach (plural beaches)

  1. The shore of a body of water, especially when sandy or pebbly.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path […]. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
  2. A horizontal strip of land, usually sandy, adjoining water.
    • 1988, Robert Ferro, Second Son:
      Up and down, the beach lay empty for miles.
  3. (Britain dialectal, Sussex, Kent) The loose pebbles of the seashore, especially worn by waves; shingle.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Japanese: ビーチ
  • Zulu: ibhishi

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

beach (third-person singular simple present beaches, present participle beaching, simple past and past participle beached)

  1. (intransitive) To run aground on a beach.
    • 1941, Emily Carr, Klee Wyck, "Salt Water," [1]
      When we finally beached, the land was scarcely less wet than the sea.
  2. (transitive) To run (something) aground on a beach.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, Chapter 90, [2]
      It seems that some honest mariners of Dover, or Sandwich, or some one of the Cinque Ports, had after a hard chase succeeded in killing and beaching a fine whale which they had originally descried afar off from the shore.
    • 1974, Homer, Iliad, translated by Robert Fitzgerald, Doubleday, Book Two, lines 530-31, p. 53,
      Great Aías led twelve ships from Sálamis
      and beached them where Athenians formed for battle.
  3. (of a vehicle) To run into an obstacle or rough or soft ground, so that the floor of the vehicle rests on the ground and the wheels cannot gain traction.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English beach.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

beach m (plural beachs)

  1. (Congo) port where goods and passengers embark and debark
    • 2006 March 14, Tshiala David, Baisse du trafic au beach Ngobila entre Kinshasa et Brazzaville, in Le Potentiel:
      C’est ainsi qu’elles ont décidé d’embarquer leurs marchandises dans des pirogues motorisés qui desservent les beachs privés entre les deux rives du fleuve Congo.
    • 2007, Jean-Alexis M'Foutou, La langue française au Congo-Brazzaville:
      Le Beach de Brazzaville hier réputé lieu de violence, de viols et de braquages, présent aujourd’hui des conditions de sécurité plutôt rassurantes.

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bech, from Proto-Celtic *beko-, *bikos (compare Middle Welsh beg-egyr, byg-egyr (drone)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰik-, *bʰoyk- (compare Czech včela, Latin fūcus), enlargement of *bʰey- (compare Welsh by-daf (beehive), English bee).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

beach f (genitive singular beiche, nominative plural beacha)

  1. bee (insect)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
beach bheach mbeach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Beach air flùr
Bee on flower

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish bech, from Proto-Celtic *beko-, *bikos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰik-, *bʰoik-, enlargement of *bʰī-, *bʰei-.

Pronunciation[edit]

Headset icon.svg This entry needs audio files. If you have a microphone, please record some and upload them. (For audio required quickly, visit WT:APR.)

Noun[edit]

beach m (genitive singular beacha, plural beachan)

  1. bee
  2. beehive
  3. wasp

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
beach bheach
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References[edit]

  • beach” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas (1911) An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language[3], Stirling, →ISBN
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “bech”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language