beck

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See also: Beck and béck

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛk/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛk

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bek, bekk, becc, from Old Norse bekkr (a stream or brook), from Proto-Germanic *bakiz (stream).

Cognate with Low German bek, beck, German Bach, Dutch beek, Swedish bäck, Old English bæc, bec, bæċe, beċe (beck, brook). Doublet of batch. More at beach.

Noun[edit]

beck (plural becks)

  1. (Norfolk, Northern English dialect) A stream or small river.
    • 1612, Michael Drayton, Poly-Olbion song 1 p. 3[1]:
      [] Whence, climing to the Cleeves, her selfe she firmlie sets / The Bourns, the Brooks, the Becks, the Rills, the Rivilets []
    • 1847, Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights, chapter XIII:
      {...} the sky is blue, and the larks are singing, and the becks and brooks are all brim full.
    • 1976, Archie Fisher (lyrics and music), “The Witch Of The West-Mer-Lands”, in The Man With A Rhyme, Sharon, CT: Folk Legacy Records:
      Beck water cold and clear, will never clean your wound
Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English bekken, a shortened form of Middle English bekenen, from Old English bēcnan, bēacnian (to signify; beckon), from Proto-West Germanic *baukn, from Proto-Germanic *baukną (beacon). More at beacon.

Noun[edit]

beck (plural becks)

  1. A significant nod, or motion of the head or hand, especially as a call or command.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

beck (third-person singular simple present becks, present participle becking, simple past and past participle becked)

  1. (archaic) To nod or motion with the head.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene iii]:
      When gold and silver becks me to come on.
    • 1896, Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr, Winter Evening Tales[2]:
      I'll buy so many acres of old Scotland and call them by the Lockerby's name; and I'll have nobles and great men come bowing and becking to David Lockerby as they do to Alexander Gordon.
    • 1881, Various, The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III[3]:
      The becking waiter, that with wreathed smiles, wont to spread for Samuel and Bozzy their "supper of the gods," has long since pocketed his last sixpence; and vanished, sixpence and all, like a ghost at cock-crowing.

Etymology 3[edit]

See back.

Noun[edit]

beck (plural becks)

  1. A vat.

Etymology 4[edit]

From Middle English bec, bek, from Old French bec (beak),

Noun[edit]

beck (plural becks)

  1. Obsolete form of beak.

Portuguese[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

beck m (plural becks)

  1. Alternative spelling of beque

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German pik, from Latin pix. See also Dutch pek, German Pech.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

beck n

  1. pitch; A dark, extremely viscous material remaining in still after distilling crude oil and tar.

Declension[edit]

Declension of beck 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative beck becket
Genitive becks beckets

Related terms[edit]