pix

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested 1932, abbreviation of pictures, first used in Variety magazine, along with other similar words that the magazine calls slanguage [1].

Noun[edit]

pix pl (plural only)

  1. (informal) Plural form of pic in the sense of "picture".
    • 1946, “Palisades Notes”, in The Billboard, Nielsen Business Media, Inc., ISSN 0006-2510, Volume 58, Number 37 (1946 September 14), page 82:
      Annual photo contest has brought in some pix by amateurs which are definitely in the professional category.
    • 1978, response to a letter to the editor, in American Motorcyclist, American Motorcyclist Association, ISSN 0277-9358, Volume 32, Number 2 (1978 February), page 4:
      Photo selection can be tricky with space limitations, Arthur, and we blew that one. Hope the Scott pix in our January issue made you feel better about this.
    • 1980, Iris Murdoch, Nuns And Soldiers:
      "But it's not much good piling up the pix if I can't sell them."
    • 2010, Lynn Powell, Framing Innocence: A Mother’s Photographs, a Prosecutor’s Zeal, and a Small Town’s Response, The New Press, →ISBN, pages 15–16:
      He nervously wrote down Amy’s instructions for what to say and how to behave if the police came back with a search warrant:
      • []
      • take pix of damage afterward
  2. Specifically, motion pictures; movies.

Etymology 2[edit]

See pyx.

Noun[edit]

pix (plural pixes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pyx [Late Middle English–19th c.]
    • 1820, [Charles Robert Maturin], chapter V, in Melmoth the Wanderer: A Tale. [], volume I, Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Company, and Hurst, Robinson, and Co., [], OCLC 1202978654, page 273:
      The slight breach was fortunately committed by a distant relation of the Archbishop of Toledo, and consisted merely in his entering the church intoxicated, (a rare vice in Spaniards), attempting to drag the matin preacher from the pulpit, and failing in that, getting astride as well as he could on the altar, dashing down the tapers, overturning the vases and the pix, and trying to scratch out, as with the talons of a demon, the painting that hung over the table, uttering all the while the most horrible blasphemies, and even soliciting the portrait of the Virgin in language not to be repeated.

Ixil[edit]

Verb[edit]

pix

  1. to tie

References[edit]

  • Dwight David Jewett and Marcos Willis, A' u u' uva'a uva' molel ca ink'a kuyolb'al atz tuch' yolb'al castiiya (Diccionario Ixil de Chajul - Español, Español - Ixil de Chajul) (1996)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *pik- (resin), from Proto-Indo-European *peyH- (fat). Cognate with Ancient Greek πίσσα (píssa, pitch, tar), Lithuanian pikis (pitch), Latin pīnus (pine), fat. More at pine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pix f (genitive picis); third declension

  1. pitch, tar

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pix picēs
Genitive picis picum
Dative picī picibus
Accusative picem picēs
Ablative pice picibus
Vocative pix picēs

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • pix in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pix in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pix in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • pix in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English pick or Bic (a brand of ballpoint pen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pix n (plural pixuri)

  1. ballpoint pen

Declension[edit]

References[edit]