pix

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested 1932, abbreviation of pictures, first used in Variety magazine, along with other similar words that the magazine calls slanguage [1].

Noun[edit]

pix pl (plural only)

  1. (informal) Plural form of pic in the sense of "picture".
    • 1946, “Palisades Notes”, in The Billboard, Nielsen Business Media, Inc., ISSN 0006-2510, Volume 58, Number 37 (1946 September 14), page 82:
      Annual photo contest has brought in some pix by amateurs which are definitely in the professional category.
    • 1978, response to a letter to the editor, in American Motorcyclist, American Motorcyclist Association, ISSN 0277-9358, Volume 32, Number 2 (1978 February), page 4:
      Photo selection can be tricky with space limitations, Arthur, and we blew that one. Hope the Scott pix in our January issue made you feel better about this.
    • 1980, Iris Murdoch, Nuns And Soldiers:
      "But it's not much good piling up the pix if I can't sell them."
    • 2010, Lynn Powell, Framing Innocence: A Mother’s Photographs, a Prosecutor’s Zeal, and a Small Town’s Response, The New Press, →ISBN, pages 15–16:
      He nervously wrote down Amy’s instructions for what to say and how to behave if the police came back with a search warrant:
      • []
      • take pix of damage afterward
  2. Specifically, motion pictures; movies.

Etymology 2[edit]

A variant of pyx.

Noun[edit]

pix (plural pixes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pyx [Late Middle English–19th c.]
    • 1509 April 20 (Gregorian calendar), Henry VII of England, [Thomas Astle], editor, The Will of King Henry VII, London: Printed for the editor; and sold by T[homas] Payne, []; and B[enjamin] White, [], published 1775, OCLC 1091582984, pages 37–38:
      [F]oraſmuche as we have often and many tymes, to our inwarde regrete and diſpleaſure, ſeen at oure Jen, in diverſe and many Churches of our Realme, the holie Sacrament of the Aulter kept in ful simple and inhoneſt Pixes, ſpecially Pixes of copre and tymbre: we have appointed and commaunded the Treſourer of our Chambre, and Maiſtre of our Juellhouſe, to cauſe to be made furthwith Pixes of ſilver and gilte, in a greate nombre, for the keping of the holie Sacrament of th'Aultre, after the faction of a Pixe that we have cauſed to be delivered to theim, []
    • 16th–17th century, Rogers Ruding, “Of the Trial of the Pix”, in [John Yonge Akerman], editor, Annals of the Coinage of Great Britain and Its Dependencies; from the Earliest Period of Authentic History to the Reign of Victoria. [], volume I, London: Printed for John Hearne, []; by Manning and Mason, [], published 1840, OCLC 1114850650, page 73:
      [T]he said Tresurer and other Officers of the sayd Mynts, to bring with them, at that tyme and place, all ther Pixes, and ther severall Indentures of Coynag, by and for the holle tyme the said Assaye shall be taken.
    • 1678, [Samuel Butler], “[The Third Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The Third and Last Part, London: [] Simon Miller, [], OCLC 123206337, canto I, page 86:
      With Croſſes, Relicks, Crucifixes, / Beads, Pictures, Roſaries and Pixes: / The Tools of working out Salvation, / By meer Mechanick Operation.
    • 1702, [William Bromley], “[In Italy]”, in Several Years Travels through Portugal, Spain, Italy, Germany, Prussia, Sweden, Denmark and the United Provinces. [], London: [] A[bel] Roper, [], R. Basset [], and W. Turner [], OCLC 731610574, page 52:
      They have Pixes and Chalices for the Bleſſed Sacrament five hundred and fifty, ſome of pure Gold, others of Silver and Criſtal; and among them, is one that was offer'd to our Bleſſed Saviour, by one of the three Kings, when they came to Worſhip him, and brought Preſents.
    • 1820, [Charles Robert Maturin], chapter V, in Melmoth the Wanderer: A Tale. [], volume I, Edinburgh: [] Archibald Constable and Company, and Hurst, Robinson, and Co., [], OCLC 1202978654, page 273:
      The slight breach was fortunately committed by a distant relation of the Archbishop of Toledo, and consisted merely in his entering the church intoxicated, (a rare vice in Spaniards), attempting to drag the matin preacher from the pulpit, and failing in that, getting astride as well as he could on the altar, dashing down the tapers, overturning the vases and the pix, and trying to scratch out, as with the talons of a demon, the painting that hung over the table, uttering all the while the most horrible blasphemies, and even soliciting the portrait of the Virgin in language not to be repeated.
    • 1851, John Ruskin, “[Appendix] 12. Romanist Modern Art.”, in The Stones of Venice, volume I (The Foundations), London: Smith, Elder, and Co., [], OCLC 982204244, page 373:
      He [Augustus Pugin] has a most sincere love for his profession, a hearty honest enthusiasm for pixes and piscinas; and though he will never design so much as a pix or piscina thoroughly well, yet better than most of the experimental architects of the day.

Verb[edit]

pix (third-person singular simple present pixes, present participle pixing, simple past and past participle pixed)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pyx

Ixil[edit]

Verb[edit]

pix

  1. to tie

References[edit]

  • Dwight David Jewett and Marcos Willis, A' u u' uva'a uva' molel ca ink'a kuyolb'al atz tuch' yolb'al castiiya (Diccionario Ixil de Chajul - Español, Español - Ixil de Chajul) (1996)

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *pik- (resin), and/or from the root *peyH- (fat). Cognate with Ancient Greek πίσσα (píssa, pitch, tar), Latin pīnus (pine). More at pine.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pix f (genitive picis); third declension

  1. pitch, tar

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pix picēs
Genitive picis picum
Dative picī picibus
Accusative picem picēs
Ablative pice picibus
Vocative pix picēs

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Italo-Romance:
    • Italian: pece
    • Sicilian: pici
  • Padanian:
  • Northern Gallo-Romance:
  • Ibero-Romance:
  • Vulgar Latin: pica
    • Southern Gallo-Romance:
  • Late Latin: picula
Borrowings

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English pick or French Bic (a brand of ballpoint pen).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pix n (plural pixuri)

  1. ballpoint pen

Declension[edit]

References[edit]