fashion

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English facioun, from Anglo-Norman fechoun (compare Jersey Norman faichon), variant of Old French faceon, fazon, façon (fashion, form, make, outward appearance), from Latin factiō (a making), from faciō (do, make); see fact. Doublet of faction.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æʃən

Noun[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

fashion (countable and uncountable, plural fashions)

  1. (countable) A current (constantly changing) trend, favored for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 1, in The China Governess[1]:
      The huge square box, parquet-floored and high-ceilinged, had been arranged to display a suite of bedroom furniture designed and made in the halcyon days of the last quarter of the nineteenth century, when modish taste was just due to go clean out of fashion for the best part of the next hundred years.
  2. (uncountable) Popular trends.
    Check out the latest in fashion.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the innocent diversions in fashion
    • (Can we date this quote by H. Spencer and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      As now existing, fashion is a form of social regulation analogous to constitutional government as a form of political regulation.
  3. (countable) A style or manner in which something is done.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
    • 2011 October 1, Phil Dawkes, “Sunderland 2 - 2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport[2]:
      It shell-shocked the home crowd, who quickly demanded a response, which came midway through the half and in emphatic fashion.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene ii]:
      OPHELIA - My lord, he hath importuned me with love in honourable fashion. LORD POLONIUS - Ay, fashion you may call it; go to, go to.
  4. The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; workmanship; execution.
    the fashion of the ark, of a coat, of a house, of an altar, etc.
  5. (dated) Polite, fashionable, or genteel life; social position; good breeding.
    men of fashion

Derived terms[edit]

terms derived from the noun “fashion”

Related terms[edit]

terms etymologically related to the noun “fashion”

Descendants[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Verb[edit]

fashion (third-person singular simple present fashions, present participle fashioning, simple past and past participle fashioned)

  1. To make, build or construct, especially in a crude or improvised way.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IX
      I have three gourds which I fill with water and take back to my cave against the long nights. I have fashioned a spear and a bow and arrow, that I may conserve my ammunition, which is running low.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist, translation by Lesley Brown, 235b:
      [] a device fashioned by arguments against that kind of prey.
  2. (dated) To make in a standard manner; to work.
    • (Can we date this quote by John Locke and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Fashioned plate sells for more than its weight.
  3. (dated) To fit, adapt, or accommodate to.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Laws ought to be fashioned to the manners and conditions of the people.
  4. (obsolete) To forge or counterfeit.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English fashion.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

fashion (invariable, comparable)

  1. (slang) fashionable, trendy

Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English fashion.

Adjective[edit]

fashion (invariable)

  1. fashionable, trendy

Noun[edit]

fashion m (plural fashions or fashion)

  1. fashion